gamma-aminobutyric acid

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Related to Aminobutyric acid: dopamine, 4-aminobutanoic acid

γ-aminobutyric acid

 (GABA) [gam″ah-ah-me″no-bu-tēr´ik]
an amino acid that is one of the principal inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system.

gamma-aminobutyric acid

 [gam″ah-ah-me″no-bu-tir´ik]
γ-aminobutyric acid; see under A.

γ-a·mi·no·bu·tyr·ic ac·id (GABA, γ-A·bu),

(ă-mē'nō-bū-tēr'ik as'id),
4-aminobutyric acid; a constituent of the central nervous system; quantitatively, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter. Used in the treatment of various neurologic disorders (for example, epilepsy).

γ-aminobutyric acid

/γ-ami·no·bu·tyr·ic ac·id/ (GABA) (-bu-tēr´ik) the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain but also occurring in several extraneural tissues, including kidney and pancreatic islet β cells. Released from presynaptic cells upon depolarization, it modulates membrane chloride permeability and inhibits postsynaptic cell firing.

gamma-aminobutyric acid

/gam·ma-ami·no·bu·tyr·ic ac·id/ (gam″ah-ah-me″no-bu-tir´ik) γ.

gamma-aminobutyric acid

(găm′ə-ə-mē′nō-byo͞o-tîr′ĭk, -ăm′ə-)
n. Abbr. GABA
An amino acid, C4H9NO2, that is not found in proteins, but occurs in the central nervous system and is associated with the transmission of nerve impulses.

gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)

an amino acid that functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain and spinal cord. It is also found in the heart, lungs, and kidneys and in certain plants.

gamma-aminobutyric acid

See GABA.

gamma-aminobutyric acid

See GABA.

GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)

A neurotransmitter that slows down the activity of nerve cells in the brain.

γ-aminobutyric acid

an amino acid that is one of the principal inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. Abbreviated GABA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evidence that nitric oxide production increases gamma aminobutyric acid permeability of the blood-brain barrier.
Antihypertensive effect of gamma aminobutyric acid enriched soy products in spontaneously hypertensive rats.
CVs >25% were observed in some amino acids present in concentrations <15 [micro]mol/L (arginine, proline, aminobutyric acid, methionine, cystine, isoleucine, and hydroxylysine).
These blocking neurons work by releasing a chemical called gamma aminobutyric acid, or GABA, which counteracts the effect of another brain chemical called glutamate.
Research Institute discovered that the infants of diabetic mothers delayed their switch to adult hemoglobin because of their exposure to elevated concentrations of aminobutyric acid, a chemical compound related to butyrate, in their mothers' blood.
Several investigators speculate that other chemical messengers in the brain, such as norepinephrine and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), play a more crucial role in movement disorders.
The precise mechanism of action by which Gabitril exerts its antiseizure effect is unknown, although it is believed to be related to its ability, documented in in vitro experiments, to enhance the activity of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.
Tiagabine is one of a new class of compounds that affects the availability in the brain of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), a naturally occurring chemical that is thought to suppress the abnormal, repetitive pattern of central nervous system activity that can lead to seizures.