gamma-aminobutyric acid

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Related to Aminobutyric acid: dopamine, 4-aminobutanoic acid

γ-aminobutyric acid

 (GABA) [gam″ah-ah-me″no-bu-tēr´ik]
an amino acid that is one of the principal inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system.

gamma-aminobutyric acid

 [gam″ah-ah-me″no-bu-tir´ik]
γ-aminobutyric acid; see under A.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

γ-a·mi·no·bu·tyr·ic ac·id (GABA, γ-A·bu),

(ă-mē'nō-bū-tēr'ik as'id),
4-aminobutyric acid; a constituent of the central nervous system; quantitatively, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter. Used in the treatment of various neurologic disorders (for example, epilepsy).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gamma-aminobutyric acid

(găm′ə-ə-mē′nō-byo͞o-tîr′ĭk, -ăm′ə-)
n. Abbr. GABA
An amino acid, C4H9NO2, that is not found in proteins, but occurs in the central nervous system and is associated with the transmission of nerve impulses.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

gamma-aminobutyric acid

See GABA.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gamma-aminobutyric acid

See GABA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)

A neurotransmitter that slows down the activity of nerve cells in the brain.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport across epithelial (Caco-2) cell monolayer.
Blood-brain barrier to H3-gamma aminobutyric acid in normal and amino oxycetic acid-treated animals.
GAD is an enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation (part of the process of breaking down for use by the body) of glutamate to GABA (gamma aminobutyric acid) and CO2.
The report identifies some growing segments: alpha-lipoic acid, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and vegetable supplements.
These blocking neurons work by releasing a chemical called gamma aminobutyric acid, or GABA, which counteracts the effect of another brain chemical called glutamate.
Perrine of Children's Hospital Oakland (Calif.) Research Institute discovered that the infants of diabetic mothers delayed their switch to adult hemoglobin because of their exposure to elevated concentrations of aminobutyric acid, a chemical compound related to butyrate, in their mothers' blood.
Several investigators speculate that other chemical messengers in the brain, such as norepinephrine and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), play a more crucial role in movement disorders.