peptide bond

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bond

 [bond]
the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, represented by a pair of dots or a line between atoms, e.g., H—O—H, H—C≡C—H or H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.
coordinate covalent bond a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond), or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond a strong covalent bond, —S—S—, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
hydrogen bond a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond the —CO—NH— linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.

pep·tide bond

the common link (-CO-NH-) between amino acids in proteins, actually a substituted amide, formed by elimination of H2O between the -COOH of one amino acid and the H2N- of another. Compare: eupeptide bond, isopeptide bond.

peptide bond

n.
The chemical bond between carboxyl groups and amino groups of neighboring amino acids, forming an amide group and constituting the primary linkage of all protein structures.

pep·tide bond

(pep'tīd bond)
The common link (-CO-NH-) between amino acids in proteins, formed by elimination of H2O between the -COOH of one amino acid and the H2N- of another.

peptide bond

A covalent bond formed between amino acids during protein synthesis. The OH- on a carbon atom links with the H- on a nitrogen atom to form a water molecule which is given off as each peptide bond is formed. Amino acids linked by peptide bonds form dipeptides, tripeptides or polypeptides.
Peptide bondclick for a larger image
Fig. 249 Peptide bond . Molecular structure. R1 R2 distinctive side-chains for different amino acids.

peptide bond

a covalent C arbon-N itrogen bond that joins the carboxyl group of one AMINO ACID to the amino group of another (with loss of a water molecule). See Fig. 249 . Many amino acids are joined by peptide bonds to form a POLYPEPTIDE CHAIN.

pep·tide bond

(pep'tīd bond)
The common link (-CO-NH-) between amino acids in proteins.

bond

the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, e.g. H−O−H, H−C= C−H and can be represented by a pair of dots between atoms, e.g. H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.

coordinate covalent bond
a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond
a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond) or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond
a strong covalent bond, −S−S−, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond
an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond
an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
human-animal bond
the psychological interdependence between humans and companion animals.
hydrogen bond
a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond
a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond
the −CO−NH− linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.
phosphoanhydride bond
a high energy bond present in ATP.
phosphodiester bond
links between nucleotides in nucleic acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
The His367 is considered very importantbecause the amide groups of its side chain forms two hydrogen bonds: first one with oxygen of side chain of Ser163 and second one with oxygen of side chain of Asp336.
Even though the average spacing between amide groups is the same in nylon 6 as it is in nylon 6/6, the nylon 6/6 has a melting point approximately 40 [degrees]C higher and is slightly stronger and stiffer than nylon 6 because of details in the molecular spacing that are beyond the scope of this article.
1] (the adsorption of MMA units hydrogen-bonded to amide groups is shown as a shoulder at 1720 [cm.
The substitution of OH adjacent to the amide group at the end of a cleaved alkyl chain may be caused by the presence of oxygen during UV exposure.
17 because of the interfacial reaction between the carboxyl group of AA component and the amide group of PA 6 during melt extrusion.
The effect of water on polyamide properties, such as the glass transition and the mechanical behavior, is well documented (3-20); due to the presence of polar amide groups along polyamide chains, strong interactions between polyamide and polar solvents like water can be formed.
The crystallinity of the amide group in the polymers calculated by this method was found to be around 75-80% (Table 1).
1] represents the vC = O H-bond, which indicates the presence of hydrogen bonding between the urethane group of CPU coating and the amide group of the PA6 fiber (14), (15).
As shown, the amide group peak at 175 pm only appeared in samples with high content of NTBA, i.
1], and the amide group in PA are presented at 1640, 1537, and 1271 [cm.
The properties of these final crosslinked products are given by [sigma] superposition of the effects of crosslinking and transformation of [sigma] fraction of the imide groups into the amide groups.