peptide bond

(redirected from Amide group)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

bond

 [bond]
the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, represented by a pair of dots or a line between atoms, e.g., H—O—H, H—C≡C—H or H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.
coordinate covalent bond a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond), or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond a strong covalent bond, —S—S—, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
hydrogen bond a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond the —CO—NH— linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.

pep·tide bond

the common link (-CO-NH-) between amino acids in proteins, actually a substituted amide, formed by elimination of H2O between the -COOH of one amino acid and the H2N- of another. Compare: eupeptide bond, isopeptide bond.

peptide bond

n.
The chemical bond between carboxyl groups and amino groups of neighboring amino acids, forming an amide group and constituting the primary linkage of all protein structures.

pep·tide bond

(pep'tīd bond)
The common link (-CO-NH-) between amino acids in proteins, formed by elimination of H2O between the -COOH of one amino acid and the H2N- of another.

peptide bond

A covalent bond formed between amino acids during protein synthesis. The OH- on a carbon atom links with the H- on a nitrogen atom to form a water molecule which is given off as each peptide bond is formed. Amino acids linked by peptide bonds form dipeptides, tripeptides or polypeptides.
Peptide bondclick for a larger image
Fig. 249 Peptide bond . Molecular structure. R1 R2 distinctive side-chains for different amino acids.

peptide bond

a covalent C arbon-N itrogen bond that joins the carboxyl group of one AMINO ACID to the amino group of another (with loss of a water molecule). See Fig. 249 . Many amino acids are joined by peptide bonds to form a POLYPEPTIDE CHAIN.

pep·tide bond

(pep'tīd bond)
The common link (-CO-NH-) between amino acids in proteins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ethylene glycol and water should perhaps be considered separately, because they have two hydroxyl functions and might be able to bond to two distinct amide groups. In the case of ethylene glycol, it is observed that its representative point is very close to the general curve of the other alcohol molecules.
The polymers under study exhibit a different crystalline behavior in the correlation with the requirement to maximize the number of hydrogen bonds imposed by density of amide groups, crystallization conditions and thermomechanical history [3,20].
This might be related to the effect of the localization of the paired electron on the amide groups of PA chains, which plays a role like a spacer [24] during the phase inversion process.
The [sup.1]H NMR spectra showed one signal for the amide group hydrogen as a triplet or singlet indicating the amide and carboxylic acid functionalities in these molecules.
Note that this repeating unit also contains six carbons, five that are attached only to hydrogen while the sixth one is part of the amide group.
The amide group of local anaesthetic agents include: bupivacaine, L-bupivacaine, lidocaine, ropivacaine, prilocaine, dibucaine, etidocaine and mepivacaine.
This might be pigskin has small amount of the molecular absorption for the functional group of carbonyl, amide group, or aromatic aldehyde.
Local anaesthetics are divided into two broad categories: the ester group which includes benzocaine and cocaine, and the amide group such as lignocaine and bupivacaine (Clark 2008).
Transannular reactions between one amide group and one other group have already been observed (Witkop et al.
ambifaria and enacyloxin analogues, with a stable amide group in place of the labile ester group and other modifications to the DHCCA-derived moiety, will be produced via a mutasynthesis strategy.
Moreover, the oxygen atom of carboxyl group of His162 also makes a strong H- bond with amide group of Gly165 with a 2.791 A distance which stabilizes the nucleophilic elbow.Further the Gln164 also assumes such a position that its amide group becomes placed in front of amide group of Leu75 belonging to Beta5 loop with an interatomic distance of 4 A .