amide

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amide

 [am´īd]
any compound derived from ammonia by substitution of an acyl radical for hydrogen, or from an acid by replacing the -OH group by -NH2.

am·ide

, primary amidesecondary amidetertiary amide (am'īd, am'id),
A substance derived from ammonia by replacing hydrogen atoms with acyl groups, R-CO-NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom results in formation of a primary amide; of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and of three hdyrogen atoms, a tertiary amide. Amides can also be derived from a carboxylic acid by replacing a carboxylic OH with NH2 from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amide; that of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and that of three atoms, a tertiary amide.

amide

/am·ide/ (am´īd) any compound derived from ammonia by substitution of an acid radical for hydrogen, or from an acid by replacing the sbondOH group by sbondNH2.

amide

(ăm′īd′, -ĭd)
n.
1. An organic compound, such as acetamide, containing the CONH2 group.
2. The anion of ammonia, NH2- or a compound containing this anion, such as sodium amide, NaNH2.

a·mid′ic (ə-mĭd′ĭk, ă-mĭd′-) adj.

amide

1 a chemical compound formed from an organic acid by the substitution of an amino (NH2, NHR, or NR2) group for the hydroxyl of a carboxyl (COOH) group.
2 a chemical compound formed by the deprotonation of ammonia (NH3) or a primary (RNH2) or secondary (R2NH) amine.

am·ide

(am'īd)
A substance formally derived from ammonia through the substitution of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by acyl groups, R-CO-NH2, or from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amide; that of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and that of three atoms, a tertiary amide.

amide

a compound formed from ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by a metal or acid radical.

am·ide

(am'īd)
A substance formally derived from ammonia through the substitution of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by acyl groups, R-CO-NH2, or from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2.

amide (am´īd),

n 1. an ammonia-derived organic compound formed through the displacement of a hydrogen atom by an acyl radical.
2. An ammonia-derived inorganic compound formed through the replacement of an acid's hydroxyl group (OH) with that of an amino group such as NH2.
3. type of local anesthetic agent. See also anesthetic, amide.

amide

any compound derived from ammonia by substitution of an acid radical for hydrogen, or from an acid by replacing the −OH group by −NH2.

amide compound herbicides
diphenamid and CDAA may cause poisoning if given in large doses. Signs include depression, weight loss and muscular weakness of the hindquarters.
References in periodicals archive ?
9 emulsion is not forming Table 2 Reference of characteristic absorption bands of sunflower-seed oil amidation products (sample 1) and oleic acid (sample 2) Absorption bands frequencies, [cm.
Dendrimers were prepared by a divergent synthesis scheme using the reagent excess method starting from EDA by consecutive Michael addition and ester amidation reaction [7].
The company specializes in a wide range of organic reaction technologies such as Amination, condensation, hydrogenation; Amidation, dehydrogenation & Mannich Reaction; Alkylation, diazotization & nitration; Bromination, esterifiction & oxidation; Catalytic hydrogenation, etherification & reduction; Chlorination & hydrogenation.
The chemical functionalization of MWCNTs by oxidation and amidation was characterized using FT-IR, TEM, and TGA.
Polyesterification, transesterification, amidation, and quaternization
The C-terminal Gly-Lys motif is almost available for amidation, which is considered as a prerequisite for its biological activity (Zhang et al.
Cyanuric chloride assists in the amidation of carboxylic acids (Christian, 2000).
The amidation of the carboxy terminus has been reported to protect against carboxypeptidases (26), and exoprotease resistance was characteristic to designated "second-generation" reporter peptides (Table 1).
It has been reported that cross-linking by amidation between carbonyl and [epsilon]-amino groups or by transamidation between such groups with the elimination of ammonia occurs upon severe heat treatment in protein molecules (Feeney, 1975).
A poly-acetamide-acetoxyl methyl-propylsiloxane (PAAMPS) polymer containing a cerium (Ce) oxide derivative was synthesized through three spontaneous reactions: condensation, amidation, and acetoxylation.
In addition, amidation of glutamine residues in cell-wall muropeptides has been reported, which presumably reduces the cross-linking within the cell walls, thereby also reducing the number of intracellular vancomycin target molecules (40).