slang

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slang

Sociology A specialized lexicon of words that are exclusive or replace other words in function, and tend to have a short life cycle. Cf Dialect, Jargon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alongside publication of letters that used this type of language, The Australian Women's Weekly even published lists of American slang terms from time to time, which aimed to provide teenagers with the most up-to-date terminology (The Australian Women's Weekly, November 17, 1954; July 3, 1957).
Green gives the same illustrative quotations as the Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang, except the 1971 quotation is worded slightly differently, thus:
She performed in comedy sketches using American slang, introduced swing records, and made what some later called "propaganda statements." Other broadcasters filled out the hour with American "news" items and commentary.
Figuration and shifting are also important mechanisms of semantic change in African American slang. Their popularity and productivity disproves the popular claims of African American speech's alleged semantic poverty and expressive deficiency with regard to standard English (see Smitherman 1977).
In American slang, it's not good if someone has your number.
Oik is an English slang term meaning rude and crude, somewhat like clod in American slang.
From the Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang we find that the reference to "hump" goes back to the 1800's.
For instance, on American Slang the song "Bring It On" lifts its "wait a minute" refrain from "Hey, Mr.
GASLIGHT ANTHEM American Slang New Jersey band channel Bruce Springsteen here, especially in Bring It On with it's hearton-its-sleeve lyrics and strained vocals.
Personalised plates that were issued and later recalled include: 18750 (American slang for police murder), 4QANC, 50KILA, DALIPS, DRGDLR, H8ACC, HOBNGR, JAPSUX, KCUFME, MDAFKR, OLDKNT, PIZZDA, PLICK, QUICKE, RNUDWN, RSWYPE, SIKCNT, TAMPON, TBAGGD and WEBUYP.
Pakistani sources said Saifullah, whose location is unknown, had spent time in the United States and is familiar with American slang and idioms.
At least at one point in its life in the Yiddish (and in Yiddish-inspired early American slang), it merely meant a light chat.

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