robin

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Related to American robins: European starlings

Rob·in

(rō-ban[h]'),
Charles P., French physician, 1821-1885. See: Virchow-Robin space.

Rob·in

(rō-ban[h]'),
Pierre, French pediatrician, 1867-1950. See: Pierre Robin syndrome.

robin

1. a bird.
2. a phytotoxin in the plant robinia pseudoacacia.
References in periodicals archive ?
elegans: American robin, Brewer's blackbird, osprey, bald eagle, sandhill crane, great blue heron, red-tailed hawk, northern harrier, common crow, and ring-billed gull.
GS = grasshopper sparrow, EM = eastern meadowlark, BO = bobolink, SS = song sparrow, FS = field sparrow, MA = mallard, RO = American robin, RW = red-winged blackbird, BT = brown thrasher and WF = willow flycatcher (bars = SE).
On average, American Robins weighed 77 g throughout the year in Pennsylvania and 86 and 84 g for males and females, respectively, during winter in Ithaca, New York (Sallabanks and James 1999).
Although the relative frequency of northern cardinals and American robins was approximately the same at Tompkins County sites, northern cardinals were 7.
American robins were observed nesting on mine infrastructure, and their greater relative density at mine plots is likely related to an increased availability of suitable nesting habitat.
Some twitchers had travelled hundreds of miles to catch a glimpse of the American robin, which had been roosting at an industrial estate for two months.
Patch size also showed no relationship with predation pressure either on American Robins ([r.
Both American Robins and Cedar Waxwings have been well studied in their breeding range and during their reproductive period (see Hamilton 1943; Knupp et al.
Bluebirds, which are in the thrush family, and American robins (also thrushes) can be found in our region throughout the year.
The species infected were a great blue heron (Ardea herodias), 2 American crows (Corvus brachyrhyncos), 2 American robins (Turdus migratorius), 2 mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), a blue-gray gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea), a northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos), a house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus), and a northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis).
American robins, common grackles, and red-winged blackbirds showed increased seroprevalence from 2003 to 2004.
These vagrants may be the early colonizers that eventually result in breeding range extensions, as has been observed in several waterfowl species, American robins, and white-throated sparrows.

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