kestrel

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kestrel

a falcon (Falco tinnunculus) with a special hovering flight and a high-pitched call. Reddish-brown with dark spots on the dorsal parts.
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Lindell and MSU colleague Megan Shave spearheaded a move to bring more American kestrels to Michigan orchards.
05, df = 27), while the number of American kestrels, also a year-round resident, stayed about the same (F = 2.
1600 h, the junior author and two colleagues were present when an adult red-tailed hawk captured and killed an adult female American kestrel (Falco sparverius) at Lemon Tank, San Clemente Island.
We found that there were significantly fewer American Kestrels (t=3.
The 2005 nesting season was my second successful year with American kestrels in nest boxes.
These findings are similar to previous results for VecTest, which also tested well with House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), and American Kestrels (Falco sparverius) (4).
Don't forget binoculars: Red-tailed hawks are frequently seen flying over the tidal marsh and grasslands, and you may also see northern harriers, osprey barn owls, American kestrels, and golden eagles.
On the other hand, studies of American kestrels that overwinter in farmlands surrounding Hawk Mountain suggest that recently increased populations of Cooper's and, possibly, sharp-shinned hawks, both of which prey on kestrels, are affecting regional populations of this small falcon (Ardia and Bildstein 1997; Ardia et al.
Seasonal shifts in sex ratios of fledgling American kestrels (Falco sparverius paulus): the early bird hypothesis.
Other Eastman wildlife habitat projects included establishing a nest box monitoring program for eastern bluebirds, American kestrels, barn owls, and purple martins; planting wetland vegetation; installing wood duck nest boxes; enhancing a wetland area; planting wildflowers; developing a database of wildlife inventory found on the plant site; and a variety of other projects that enhance and protect wildlife and land on unused Eastman property.
She and her colleagues duplicated the conditions on the platforms by exposing captured American kestrels to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of 30 microteslas throughout two breeding seasons.
Approximately 31% of all American kestrels seen (n = 59) flew at heights that were within the blade-swept area of the KVS-33 turbines used at the Buffalo Ridge WRA.

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