Ambrosia

(redirected from Ambrosian)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

bee pollen

Fringe nutrition
A food supplement which contains 55% carbohydrate by weight, as well as protein, fat, minerals and vitamins. The composition and content of bee pollen reflects the plants the worker bees visited before harvesting. It is claimed to be useful for allergies and anaphylactic shock in those allergic to bees, although, if it contains bee particulates, can itself evoke an anaphylactic reaction. Nearly 200 fungi and 30 bacteria have been isolated from bee pollen. It has been promoted by its advocates to enhance athletic performance and be effective for alcoholism, balding, diabetes, poor vision, memory loss and other conditions.

Ambrosia

(am-brō′zh(e-)ă) [Gr., food of the gods, immortality]
A genus of weeds commonly known as ragweed. Ambrosia species include A. artemisiaefolia and A. trifida (“giant ragweed”) and are a major source of seasonal pollen and allergies in North America. Ambrosia allergens are abbreviated Amb by the World Health Organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ambrosian Rite is an ancient Catholic liturgical tradition found in parts of Milan, Lombardy and Ticino.
6:5, however, neither Symmachus nor the Ambrosian Codex uses these affinities as a basis for interpreting [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
Barely fleshed out and only a minor presence in the film, he is merely an incarnation of the Ambrosian virtues: sacrifice, fortitude, democracy.
Although we have lost much direct evidence of Dorat's teaching, his lecture on book ten of the Odyssey has been preserved in the notes of an anonymous student, found in a manuscript at the Ambrosian library in Milan and recently edited and translated by Philip Ford.
Anthony Ward describes the evolution of the Ambrosian rite through the Middle Ages down to the present day.
It was a fascinating meltingpot: ruled by Spain, but with a strong local patriciate and senate; the most populous diocese in the Catholic world, but with a considerable number of religious houses independent of the archbishop; a distinctive local liturgy (Ambrosian), which was allowed to remain after the Council of Trent, vying with the centralizing trends within the post-Tridentine church represented by the Roman rite.
Quilici's essay (like Barber's mentioned above) studies a group of bindings in a particular place, in this case the great Ambrosian Library in Milan.
(1) The old man is not named in the play; the name Lysidamus is read in the scene headings in the Ambrosian palimpsest, but may not be Plautine: cf.
The chapters deal sequentially with the emergence of anti-Nicene or Homoian doctrines and their apparent supremacy; early pro-Nicene reactions presented by such authorities as Hilary of Poitiers and Eusebius of Vercelli; tension between north Italian Homoians and anti-Homoians; three chapters on Ambrose and his anti-Nicene resistance in Milan and at the Council of Aquileia; Homoian response in 384 to the Ambrosian resistance, which Williams defines as "a Homoian Revival"; and the ultimate Nicene victory, attributed by Williams to Ambrose's discovery of the relics of Protasius and Gervasius in Milan and the seizure of the city by the Catholic usurper Magnus Maximus in A.D.
Perhaps all that remains of local resistance to Frankish appropriation of the most special cult site of northern Italy is the late tradition (recorded by the Milanese chronicler Landulf Senior in the late eleventh century) that Charlemagne had attempted to abolish the city's own liturgy and baptismal customs, which had supposedly been handed down from Saint Ambrose and known as the Ambrosian Rite.