Ambrosia

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bee pollen

Fringe nutrition
A food supplement which contains 55% carbohydrate by weight, as well as protein, fat, minerals and vitamins. The composition and content of bee pollen reflects the plants the worker bees visited before harvesting. It is claimed to be useful for allergies and anaphylactic shock in those allergic to bees, although, if it contains bee particulates, can itself evoke an anaphylactic reaction. Nearly 200 fungi and 30 bacteria have been isolated from bee pollen. It has been promoted by its advocates to enhance athletic performance and be effective for alcoholism, balding, diabetes, poor vision, memory loss and other conditions.

Ambrosia

(am-brō′zh(e-)ă) [Gr., food of the gods, immortality]
A genus of weeds commonly known as ragweed. Ambrosia species include A. artemisiaefolia and A. trifida (“giant ragweed”) and are a major source of seasonal pollen and allergies in North America. Ambrosia allergens are abbreviated Amb by the World Health Organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ambrosian Rite is an ancient Catholic liturgical tradition found in parts of Milan, Lombardy and Ticino.
6:5, however, neither Symmachus nor the Ambrosian Codex uses these affinities as a basis for interpreting [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
A case in point addresses the Ambrosian resistance to the anti-Nicene forces.
Perhaps all that remains of local resistance to Frankish appropriation of the most special cult site of northern Italy is the late tradition (recorded by the Milanese chronicler Landulf Senior in the late eleventh century) that Charlemagne had attempted to abolish the city's own liturgy and baptismal customs, which had supposedly been handed down from Saint Ambrose and known as the Ambrosian Rite.
Modern evaluations of Fronto's mastery of language are based on the information contained in the Noctes Atticae of Aulus Gellius, a member of Fronto's circle; on a collection of Fronto's letters; and on miscellaneous pieces discovered in 1815 in the Ambrosian Library in Milan.
18) Controversy surrounds 540-42, which are part of a passage (540-51) omitted by the Ambrosian manuscript.
In Westminster Abbey on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 July 1961 there were assembled seven soloists (Heather Harper, Mary Thomas, Janet Baker, Wilfred Brown, David Galliver, Richard Standen, John Noble), the Ambrosian Singers and the Philomusica of London.
After teaching for five years, he joined the staff of the Ambrosian Library and from that time onward was engaged in intensive academic research and writing.
Nevertheless, the understanding since Trent of the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist has developed from the Ambrosian model, wherein the elements undergo a real, metabolic change, albeit one that results in a static--as opposed to a dynamic, fourth-century Antiochene--notion of how Christ is present in them.
It's also where the sign of peace still falls in the Ambrosian Rite, the ancient form of the Mass celebrated in some regions of northern Italy and Switzerland.
Awakening, the arts center's multidenominational dance company, performed to a wide range of music, including "Kumbaya" by the Soweto Gospel Choir, "The Maker" by Dave Matthews, and "O Holy Night" by the Ambrosian Singers and the London Festival Orchestra.
If Byron has not much to say to her about the art galleries (he would provide a more expansive account of them to John Murray a few days later), he describes in some detail the "manuscript collection (preserved in the Ambrosian library), of original love-letters and verses of Lucretia de Borgia & Cardinal Bembo" (BLJ 5:114).