ragweed

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ragweed

(răg′wēd′)
n.
1. Any of various weeds of the genus Ambrosia of the composite family, having small, greenish, unisexual flower heads and producing abundant pollen that is one of the chief causes of hay fever.
2. Chiefly British Ragwort.

ragweed

[rag′wēd]
Etymology: ME, ragge, rag + AS, weod, herb, grass, weed
any of various species of plants of the genus Ambrosia whose pollen can cause hay fever.

ragweed

A plant of the family Compositae, the pollen from which is highly allergenic and the most common cause of allergic rhinitis.
 
Diagnosis
Bronchial provocation testing, in which pollen is inhaled through a dosimeter.
 
Management
Avoidance of pollens by staying indoors; use of cromolyn, antihistamines, sympathomimetics, theophylline and corticosteroids.

ragweed

Ambrosia artemisiifolia Allergy medicine Any of the weedy composite herbs of family Compositae, the pollen from which is highly allergenic Diagnosis Bronchial provocation testing, in which pollen is inhaled through a dosimeter Management Avoid pollen, stay indoors, cromolyn, antihistamines, sympathomimetics, theophylline, corticosteroids Drug slang A street term for low quality marijuana or heroin

ragweed,

n Latin names:
Ambrosia artemisifolia, Ambrosia trifida. An annual weed that blooms in the fall and is implicated as the primary cause of hay fever.

ragweed

see artemisia, a name sometimes used for senecio but more commonly ambrosia elatir, or Franseria discolor (white ragweed).
References in periodicals archive ?
Capitulos masculinos turbinados, mas o menos pubescentes y ciliados, con pelos multicelulares cortos de base conica y pelos largos, aquenio rematado en un pico provisto de cinco pequenos dientes Ambrosia artemisiifolia
En algunos casos particulares, como los de Ambrosia artemisiifolia y A.
were placed, within 24 h after hatching, individually in dishes with two discs of Ambrosia artemisiifolia, and three others from each brood were individually provided with (simultaneously) one disc of Eupatorium perfoliatum and one of Solidago altissima.
Upon eclosion, two females from each brood were provided with Iva and two with Ambrosia artemisiifolia, and each was given a male (almost no matings were between sibs).
ANOVAs of oviposition on Iva frutescens and Ambrosia artemisiifolia by Ophraella notulata.
11), with Ambrosia artemisiifolia as the dominant species, followed by exotic and native weeds of much lower relative importance.
Larvae and adults feed on foliage of ragweeds, especially Ambrosia artemisiifolia and A.
Ambrosia artemisiifolia is the sole host of the species throughout the eastem United States.