ragweed

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ragweed

(răg′wēd′)
n.
1. Any of various weeds of the genus Ambrosia of the composite family, having small, greenish, unisexual flower heads and producing abundant pollen that is one of the chief causes of hay fever.
2. Chiefly British Ragwort.

ragweed

A plant of the family Compositae, the pollen from which is highly allergenic and the most common cause of allergic rhinitis.
 
Diagnosis
Bronchial provocation testing, in which pollen is inhaled through a dosimeter.
 
Management
Avoidance of pollens by staying indoors; use of cromolyn, antihistamines, sympathomimetics, theophylline and corticosteroids.

ragweed

Ambrosia artemisiifolia Allergy medicine Any of the weedy composite herbs of family Compositae, the pollen from which is highly allergenic Diagnosis Bronchial provocation testing, in which pollen is inhaled through a dosimeter Management Avoid pollen, stay indoors, cromolyn, antihistamines, sympathomimetics, theophylline, corticosteroids Drug slang A street term for low quality marijuana or heroin
References in periodicals archive ?
Risk to nontarget plants from Ophraella communa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a potential biological control agent of alien invasive weed Ambrosia artemisiifolia (Asteraceae) in China.
Is sunflower (Helianthus annuus) at risk to damage from Ophraella communa, a natural enemy of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia)?
Ozone affects pollen viability and NAD(P)H oxidase release from Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen.
Increasing Amb a 1 content in common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen as a function of rising atmospheric C[O.sub.2] concentration.
Plantas anuales, hojas subglabras o puberulas por ambas caras, con pelos multicelulares escabridos de base bulbosa, mas densos en la cara abaxial Ambrosia artemisiifolia
Of the nine species with the highest average densities [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED], three species, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, Agrostis capillaris, and Carex sp., occurred at significantly higher mean densities in the high-fertility plots than predicted by our simulation [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED].
ANOVAs of oviposition on Iva frutescens and Ambrosia artemisiifolia by Ophraella notulata.
11), with Ambrosia artemisiifolia as the dominant species, followed by exotic and native weeds of much lower relative importance.
In this study, we sought to increase our understanding of the potential response of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.), a late-season flowering allergenic plant, to springtime climate variability and examine interactive effects of increased C[O.sub.2].
communa: Calif., San Diego Co., Kitchen Creek, Ambrosia psilostachya (1); Calif., Inyo Co., Antelope Spring, Iva axillaris (2, same haplotype as from Kitchen Creek); Conn., Fairfield Co., Reading, Ambrosia artemisiifolia (1); Fla., Leon Co., lamonia, A.
Experiment 7 (August 1991) examined larval feeding and survival on Artemisia vulgaris, Chrysopsis villosa, Solidago bicolor, and the natural host Ambrosia artemisiifolia. Each of 20 males was mated to two (N = 15) or three females, isolated as pupae collected in the field, and kept in separate dishes until oviposition.
(2003) showed that the higher C[O.sub.2] concentrations and air temperatures of urban areas were associated with differences in ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia).