ambon

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ambon

 [am´bon]
the fibrocartilaginous edge of the socket in which the head of a long bone is lodged.

ambon

/am·bon/ (am´bon) the fibrocartilaginous ring forming the edge of the socket in which the head of a long bone is lodged.

ambon

An obsolete term that formerly dignified the fibrocartilaginous ring attached to articular sockets of long bones, e.g., labrum acetabulare and the labrum glenoidale.

ambon

the fibrocartilaginous edge of the socket in which the head of a long bone is lodged.
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Just as the spice islands of the Moluccas had an impact on history far beyond their size, Pointy Shoes and Pith Helmets should not only appeal to specialists of Ambonese or Indonesian history, but to all scholars fascinated with dress systems or sartorial hierarchies in colonial or multicultural contexts.
Illustrations in The Ambonese Curiosity Cabinet include specimens of the plants and animals as well as the minerals of the region.
An Ambonese commander newly appointed at the Academy had chosen the song.
With Dutch help, Ambon declared its independence as the Republic of South Maluku--but Ambonese nationalist-separatism has not been a strong current in Maluku politics since the 1950s.
In September 2003 in the Moluccas capital of Ambon, thousands of Muslim and Christian Ambonese gathered to celebrate the 48th anniversary of the city's founding.
The response of the early Ambonese foragers to the Maluku spice trade: The archaeological evidence.
Some Ambonese Christians responded by forming a "Laskar Christian," yet it never fielded more than 200 fighters, and its links to a regional independence movement from the 1950s, now exiled in Holland, only served to fuel the military's desire to squash it at all costs.
He concludes his essay by asking rhetorically whether the current political leadership is willing or able to bring the diversity back into the unity, so that Papuans, Acehenese, Ambonese and others can feel part of Indonesia.
In Japanese terms they had become "sub-soldiers", who like the many Ambonese and other Indonesians in the Netherlands Indies and New Guinea "lived in the same billeting quarters together with the Japanese".
About 12,000 former Ambonese soldiers of the Royal Netherlands Indies Army (KNIL) working for the Dutch then proclaimed the area's independence from Indonesia.
Syntactic change in Ambonese Malay: the possessive construction.
Dieter Bartels argues that the Ambonese responded to Europeans by absorbing elements of the newcomers' beliefs thought to confer access to sources of power previously unknown, eventually syncretising them into a system in which traditional elements were preserved.