amaranth

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Related to Amaranthus retroflexus: Amaranthus hybridus

am·a·ranth

, amaranthum (am'ă-ranth, am-ă-ran'thŭm), [C.I. 16185]
An azo dye; a soluble reddish-brown powder that turns magenta red in solution; used as a food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic coloring agent, and occasionally in histology.
[G. amaranthon, a never-fading flower]

am·a·ranth

(am'ă-ranth)
A weed (Amaranthus) of widespread geographic distribution; some species are consumed as a foodstuff; its prolific ability to produce seed allows its use as a flour. Purported value both internally and externally (e.g., astringent).
Synonym(s): love-lies-bleeding, red cockscomb.
[G. amaranthon, a never-fading flower]
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of maize residues and tillage on emergence of Setaria faberi, Abutilon theophrasti, Amaranthus retroflexus, and Chenopodium album.
The primary weeds observed at both locations were giant foxtail (Setaria faberi Herrm.), common lambs-quarter (Chenopodium album L.), redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.), and Pennsylvania smartweed (Polygonum pensylvanicum L.).
Effects of short-term selection along environmental gradients on variation in populations of Amaranthus retroflexus and Abutilon theophrasti.
Os valores de Tb estimados nesse trabalho sao proximos da Tb estimada para seis especies daninhas de culturas de verao dos Estados Unidos--1,3[grados]C para Ambrosia trifida, 8,0[grados]C para Digitaria sanguinalis, 8,5[grados]C Amaranthus retroflexus, 4,5[grados]C Abutilon theophrasti, 2,2[grados]C para Panicum milliaceum e 5,1[grados]C para Eriochloa villosa (GRAMIG & STOLTENBERG, 2007).
Effect of corn-induced shading and temperature on rate of leaf appearance in redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.).
The flora of the plot borders was dominated by lambsquarter (Chenopodium album L.), dandelion (Taraxacum officinale Weber ex Wiggers), Muhlenbergia frondosa (Poiret) Fernald, foxtail grass (Setaria spp.), rough pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) and yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) (Plant nomenclature follows Gleason and Cronquist, 1991.) Areas surrounding the study site consisted of grasses which were mowed occasionally for hay as well as conventional and conservation tillage corn fields.
Bhowmik and Doll (1983) investigated the allelopathic effects of redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus) and yellow foxtail (Setaria glauca) residues on corn (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) at different temperatures and photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD).
1993), and there were substantial differences in germination of Pgi genotypes of Amaranthus retroflexus in response to variation in oxygen availability and soil moisture (Zangerl and Bazzaz 1984a,b).