dry socket

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Related to Alveolar osteitis: dry socket

socket

 [sok´et]
a hollow into which a corresponding part fits.
dry socket a condition sometimes occurring after tooth extraction, particularly after traumatic extraction, resulting in a dry appearance of the exposed bone in the socket, due to disintegration or loss of the blood clot. It is basically a focal osteomyelitis without suppuration and is accompanied by severe pain (alveolalgia) and foul odor. Called also alveolar osteitis.

al·ve·o·al·gi·a

(al'vē-ō-al'jē-ă),
A postoperative complication of tooth extraction in which the blood clot in the socket disintegrates, resulting in focal osteomyelitis and severe pain.
[alveolus + G. algos, pain]

dry socket

n.
A painful inflamed condition at the site of extraction of a tooth that occurs when a blood clot fails to form properly or is dislodged.

dry socket

an inflamed condition of a tooth socket (alveolus) after a tooth extraction. The socket is not actually dry but is filled with a degenerating, infective blood clot. Normally a blood clot forms over the alveolar bone at the base of the socket after an extraction. If the clot fails to form properly or becomes dislodged, bone tissue and nerve endings are exposed to the oral environment and can become infected, a usually painful condition. Analgesics, applied topical sedatives, and drainage are required, in addition to treatment with local or systemic antibiotic therapy to cure the infection. See also alveolitis.
A complication in 1–2% of all tooth extractions, most commonly in molar teeth; the wounds consist of focal osteomyelitis, in which the clot in the socket disintegrates prematurely and becomes a nidus for oral bacteria. Dry socket responds poorly to therapy; it must therefore be aggressively prevented, and local or systemic antibiotics given at the time of extraction

dry socket

Alveolar osteitis Odontology A complication in 1-2% of all tooth extractions, most commonly in molar teeth; the wounds consist of focal osteomyelitis, in which the clot in the socket disintegrates prematurely and becomes a nidus for oral bacteria Clinical Severe pain and foul odor without purulence; DS responds poorly to therapy; it must therefore be aggressively prevented, and local or systemic antibiotics at the time of extraction

al·ve·o·al·gi·a

(al-vē'ō-al'jē-ă)
A postoperative complication of tooth extraction in which the blood clot in the socket disintegrates, resulting in focal osteomyelitis and severe pain.
Synonym(s): alveolalgia, dry socket.
[alveolus + G. algos, pain]

dry socket

Inflammation of the soft tissues of a tooth socket, occurring two or three days after extraction of a tooth, usually a lower molar. The condition is painful and may persist for days or weeks. The attention of a dentist is required.

Dry socket

A painful condition following tooth extraction in which a blood clot does not properly fill the empty socket. Dry socket leaves the underlying bone exposed to air and food.

al·ve·o·al·gi·a

(al-vē'ō-al'jē-ă)
A postoperative complication of tooth extraction in which the blood clot in the socket disintegrates, resulting in focal osteomyelitis and severe pain.
Synonym(s): alveolalgia, alveolar osteitis, dry socket.
[alveolus + G. algos, pain]

dry socket,

n See socket, dry and osteitis.

socket

a hollow into which a corresponding part fits.

dry socket
alveolar osteitis.
tooth socket
References in periodicals archive ?
2% chlorhexidine gluconate and amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid on the prevention of alveolar osteitis following mandibular third molar extractions.
The relationship between the indications for the surgical removal of impacted third molars and the incidence of alveolar osteitis.
36 Larsen PE: Alveolar osteitis after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars.
4 Alveolar osteitis has been recently defined as postoperative pain inside and around the extraction site which increases in severity at any time between the first and third day after the extraction accom- panied by a partial or total disintegrated blood clot within the alveolar socket with or without halitosis.
6 Alveolar osteitis remains one of the most common postoperative complications after dental extractions and it is a good model to study bone infections in the oral cavity.
The incidence of alveolar osteitis occurred in one patient of Group II (5%) whereas it was nil in Group I.
5% povidone iodine in control of postoperative pain and alveolar osteitis following the removal of impacted lower third molars.
12 Percent chlorhexidine rinse on the prevention of alveolar osteitis.
The effect of a chlorhexidine rinse on the incidence of alveolar osteitis following the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars.
It was concluded that immediate packing of extraction sockets with solcoseryl containing pack is beneficial in preventing alveolar osteitis.
This literature review summarizes the current understanding of etiology, pathogenesis, prevention and management of alveolar osteitis.