Alvarado score


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Alvarado score

(al-vă-rod′ō)
[A. Alvarado, U.S. physician]
A diagnostic tool to estimate the likelihood that a patient with abdominal pain has appendicitis. It includes the following clinical features: 1) an elevated white blood cell count (esp. when associated with a left shift); 2) abdominal pain that migrates to the right lower quadrant of the abdomen; 3) loss of appetite; 4) nausea and/or vomiting; 5) tenderness in the right lower quadrant; 6) rebound tenderness; and 7) fever. Patients with few of these clinical features are unlikely to have an inflamed appendix; patients with most of these findings are likely to benefit from appendectomy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Modified Alvarado Score of all patients was calculated on a proforma which included migratory right iliac fossa pain, anorexia, nausea/vomiting, tenderness in right iliac fossa, rebound tenderness, elevated temperature and leucocytosis (>10 x 109/L).
Objective: In this study, we aimed to show the effectiveness of Alvarado score and its components to predict the correct diagnosis of acute appendicitis and to find an optimum cut-off value for Alvarado score.
Alvarado score introduced in 19851516 and its modified version [17] is the most widely used scoring system.
In the present study, the Alvarado score was higher in the partial cecectomy group than in the extended cecectomy group.
The use of the Alvarado score in the management of right lower quadrant abdominal pain in the adult, Journal of Visceral Surgery, April 2010.
Sohail made a presentation on "An Experience of Alvarado Score in LUMHS".
The investigators matched the control patients with cases on age, gender, Alvarado score (a numeric value based on eight signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis), and year of diagnosis.
Evaluation of the modified Alvarado score in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: a prospective study.
Diagnostic values of a single serum biomarker at different time points compared with Alvarado score and imaging examinations in pediatric appendicitis.