altruism

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Related to Altruists: unselfishness, altruism

altruism

(al′troo-ĭz-ĭm) [Fr. altruisme]
Acting for the benefit of others regardless of the consequences for oneself.

involuntary altruism

An action that is taken on behalf of others not because of one's own choosing but because of coercion, fiat, or legislation.
altruist (al′troo-ist″) altruistic (al″troo-is′tik)

altruism

Behaviour manifesting unselfish concern for the advantage of others. Much seemingly altruistic behaviour can be shown, on analysis, not to be so, and there are those who hold that altruism is a myth. Most social scientists, however, accept the concept.
References in periodicals archive ?
Without bias or re-composition, even though collectives with more altruists have higher fitness, all selection is happening at the particle level and altruists will die out.
The Altruists credo was alien to everyone: 'To see the world as others see it, to consider the well-being of others before our own.' The Altruists sect believed the evil past ages of humankind were the result of selfish individuals, out for personal gain, forcing their views on the peace-loving masses.
In addition, if anything, targeting gifts should increase the gifts of altruists. Positive gift externalities lead altruists to the free riding problem, which implies that decreasing group size will increase average contributions.
It is not necessary to assume that effectuators cue in altruism (intelligent or otherwise) in others effectuators need not take on the cognitive costs of finding others who think like them or analyzing whether others are "intelligent altruists." As long as interacting with others will create resources for entrepreneurs and attract resourceful "others" who are willing to contribute to the evolving vision of the entrepreneurs, effectual logic will accommodate such diverse partners.
When it comes to health care, Americans are consumers, "not altruists," she said.
The idea is that groups containing altruists possess survival advantages against groups that do not.
It could be that this model misspecifies the behavior of subjects by including egoists with altruists. A standard finding in much of the literature on dictator games and public goods games is that anywhere from 20% to 25% of the population keeps everything.
This function of market prices is equally relevant to a society of perfect altruists and to one composed entirely of selfish egotists.
Of course, they may end up getting the wrong end of the stick, but the instinct to idealize women as innocent victims or as intuitive altruists seems misguided if one cares about women's well-being.
Using the brain scans, the researchers could identify subjects as "altruists" or "egoists" depending on the amount of activity in the reward centers under different scenarios.
Simply put, the claim is that groups with some altruists have survival advantage over groups without them.