altruism

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Related to Altruistic behavior: Altruists

altruism

[al′tro̅o̅·iz′əm]
a sense of unconditional concern for the welfare of others. It may be expressed at the level of the individual, the group, or the larger social system. It is one of the curative factors of participating in group therapy. altruistic, adj.

altruism

(al′troo-ĭz-ĭm) [Fr. altruisme]
Acting for the benefit of others regardless of the consequences for oneself.

involuntary altruism

An action that is taken on behalf of others not because of one's own choosing but because of coercion, fiat, or legislation.
altruist (al′troo-ist″) altruistic (al″troo-is′tik)

altruism

Behaviour manifesting unselfish concern for the advantage of others. Much seemingly altruistic behaviour can be shown, on analysis, not to be so, and there are those who hold that altruism is a myth. Most social scientists, however, accept the concept.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some participants endorsed religion as a positive influence in altruistic behavior, whereas other participants questioned the motivations behind caring acts within a religious context.
Design and evaluation of a program to promote prosocial altruistic behavior in the school.
Within the field of ethology this is common Knowledge, Insects such as ants and bees, all sorts of mammals, some birds, display some kind of altruistic behavior, be it to parents, or to their social group.
Much of the research combines religion and spirituality even though they may be distinct in how predictive they are of both compassion and altruistic behaviors.
The relationship between altruistic behavior and the development of a community was a general theme that emerged when we analyzed the data.
While high altruistic behavior seems ideal yet, if the behavior is directed to one person who may not be ethical (i.
Further, individual differences in altruistic behavior show consistency.
The basic thrust of Levinas' criticism is that altruistic behavior, which by definition reduces the individual fitness of the altruist, cannot possibly have evolved by natural selection.
Several studies have shown a link between altruistic behavior and increases in overall longevity, and researchers have speculated that this might be due in part to how well-doing inoculates us against stress and negative emotions.
Emotions influence empathic and altruistic behavior, and they play a role in the creative processes of the mind.
Most important, perhaps, the altruistic behavior of disaster victims challenges the conservative position that people are by nature selfish, competitive and avaricious.
New developments at the intersection of ethics and cognitive science demonstrate that human beings experience benefits from altruistic behavior.