altitude

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altitude

[al′tito̅o̅d]
Etymology: L, altitudo, height
the level of elevation of any location on earth with reference to a fixed surface point, which is usually sea level. Several types of health effects are associated with altitude extremes, including a greater intensity of ultraviolet radiation that results from a thinner atmosphere. Barometric pressure decreases as altitude increases, so there are fewer molecules of oxygen. Thus breathing becomes faster & deeper, although demands of physical effort and cellular respiration are the same as at a lower altitude. High-altitude cardiac intolerance is usually worse in people with blood or pulmonary disorders. See also altitude sickness.
Altitude: relation between decreasing barometric pressure and PO2 and levels for athletic training. Broken arrow: altitude sickness possible in the unacclimatized.

altitude

the height above sea level. As atmospheric (barometric) pressure decreases progressively with increasing altitude, from the standard 1 atmosphere at sea level, the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) decreases proportionately; the air still contains the same ∼21% of oxygen but there are fewer molecules of oxygen per unit volume. There is also a drop in temperature and humidity, but the essential problem for human life and activity is shortage of oxygen (hypoxia).

altitude,

n pertaining to any location on earth with reference to a fixed surface point, which is usually sea level. The higher the altitude, the lower the oxygen concentration and the greater the ultraviolet radiation, both of which can cause health problems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Controlled studies using classic altitude training showed an increase in SL performance and VO at altitudes between 1,800 and 2,700 m (32,72).
High Altitude sickness - also known as Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) -- is a pathological condition caused by acute exposure to low partial pressure of oxygen at high altitude.
Several teams decided to live at low altitudes (>500 m); whereas, others stayed at sea level during the World Cup.
The ice events also are nearly at sea level, with other venues ranging from altitudes of around 2,600 feet for the sled events to around 5,000 feet for women's and men's downhill skiing.
Diffusing capacity predicted values, as well as results, are slightly different between sea level and at altitudes of a little over 5,000 such as the case in Denver and Salt Lake City.
Although the system dramatically improves our ability to accurately measure altitudes, its guaranteed accuracy is +-200 feet.
It's a paradox that there are different effects [of global warming] at high and low altitudes, but both are real," Solomon says.
Perhaps others found the 4000 top altitude confusing, given the 11,000 restriction at TERPZ.
Up to 15 % of travelers to altitudes over 2,500 m (8,202 ft) will develop HAPE, depending on the traveler's age and sex, and the rate of ascent18.
The theory is that a phenomena termed ice crystal icing is occurring on warmer than freezing surfaces inside the engines operating at high altitudes due to the ingestion of ice crystals [2].