Herpesviridae

(redirected from Alphaherpesvirus)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Her·pes·vir·i·dae

(her'pēs-vir'i-dē),
A heterogeneous family of morphologically similar viruses, all of which contain double-stranded DNA and infect humans and a wide variety of other vertebrates. Infections produce type A inclusion bodies; in many instances, infection may remain latent for many years, even in the presence of specific circulating antibodies. Virions are enveloped, ether sensitive, and vary up to 200 nm in diameter; the nucleocapsids are 100 nm in diameter and of icosahedral symmetry, with 162 capsomeres. The family is subdivided into three subfamilies Alphaherpesvirinae, Betaherpesvirinae, and Gammaherpesvirinae, and includes herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus (all of which infect humans), pseudorabies virus of swine, equine rhinopneumonitis virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, canine herpesvirus, B virus of Old World monkeys, several viruses of New World monkeys, virus III of rabbits, infectious laryngotracheitis virus of fowl, Marek disease virus of chickens, Lucké tumor virus of frogs, and many others.

Her·pes·vir·i·dae

(hĕrpēz-viri-dē)
A heterogeneous family of morphologically similar viruses, all of which contain double-stranded DNA and infect humans and a wide variety of other vertebrates. Infections produce type A inclusion bodies; in many instances, infection may remain latent for many years, even in the presence of specific circulating antibodies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although known by several names over the years since its initial isolation in 1932 (Herpesvirus simiae, monkey B virus, Herpes B, and Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1), BV is currently designated as Macacine alphaherpesvirus 1 by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses.
(2016) verified that the expression of FOS and DUSP-1 was activated by immediate stress response in cells infected with Suid alphaherpesvirus 1 (more commonly known as pseudorabies virus or Aujeszky's disease virus).
The following viruses were not detected in CNS samples by PCR: porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus types 1 and 2, porcine circovirus 2, suid alphaherpesvirus 1, teschovirus A, sapelovirus A, or atypical porcine pestivirus.
Bloom, "Alphaherpesvirus latency: a dynamic state of transcription and reactivation," Advances in Virus Research, vol.
These proteins are also important determinants of alphaherpesvirus tropism and pathogenesis, since they are responsible for the initial interactions with host cells by binding to cell surface receptors, attachment, fusion and entry into mammalian cells (18).
Although results of histopathologic investigations suggested that malnutrition, because of fewer resources in the frigates' fishing area, could be the cause of the epidemic, a novel alphaherpesvirus, tentatively called Fregata magnificens herpesvirus, was detected in cutaneous crusts on the diseased birds.
Muchos Alphaherpesvirus producen lesiones localizadas, principalmente de la mucosa de los tractos respiratorio y genital o de la piel, caracterizada por la produccion secundaria de vesiculas, pustulas y ulceras superficiales que se recubren de una pseudomembrana y curan de 10 a 14 dias, normalmente sin que se formen costras.
Thus, this study investigated the occurrence of FcaGHV1 infection among domestic cats and correlated it with feline retroviruses (feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV)) and with other viral pathogens such as Carnivore protoparvovirus 1 (CPPV-1), previously known as feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), and Feline alphaherpesvirus 1 (FeHV-1).
Alignments of human and NHP alphaherpesvirus representa fives show that the region amplified with the consensus herpesvirus primers is a highly conserved region of UL30 (Figure 2).
Similar results have been reported for an Acanthospermum hispidum extract which is effective during the attachment phase of pseudorabies virus, an alphaherpesvirus, but not during the replication period (Summerfield et al., 1997).