maltase

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α-d-glu·co·si·dase

(glū-kō'si-dās),
Maltase; a glucohydrolase removing terminal nonreducing 1,4-linked α-glucose residues by hydrolysis, yielding α-glucose; a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme is associated with glycogen storage disease type II. At least five isozymes of maltase exist.
Synonym(s): glucoinvertase

maltase

(môl′tās′, -tāz′)
n.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of maltose to glucose.

maltase

An enzyme that splits MALTOSE.

maltase

an enzyme that hydrolyses MALTOSE to glucose. In mammals it is produced in the CRYPT OF LIEBERKUHN in the SMALL INTESINE and is present in the SUCCUS ENTERICUS. Maltase is also present in many seeds.
References in periodicals archive ?
(4,5) From this perspective, therapies that have a weight-neutral or weight-reducing effect (metformin, GLP-1 receptor agonists, SGLT-2 inhibitors, DPP-4 inhibitors, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors) are preferred over those that promote weight gain (sulfonylureas, insulin, thiazolidinediones).
Clinical features and acid alpha-glucosidase gene mutation in 7 Chinese patients with glycogen storage disease type II (in Chinese).
The role of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose).
The diagnosis was confirmed through enzyme assay on a dried blood specimen, which revealed decreased alpha-glucosidase activity.
To confirm the suspicion of Pompe disease the quantitation of alpha-glucosidase activity is mandatory and, in case of positivity, molecular genetic testing provides finalization of the diagnosis.
We found statistically significant correlations between increased resistance to 5-fluorocytosine and higher activity of naphthyl phosphohydrolase and lipase; increased resistance to miconazole and higher activity of beta-glucosidase; increased resistance to fluconazole and higher activity of alpha-glucosidase, alpha-galactosidase, and fucosidase.
Antisense Oligonucleotide to Activate Acid Alpha-Glucosidase for Pompe Disease - Drug Profile 41
There are seven pharmacologic subclasses of oral antidiabetic agents: alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, meglitinides, sulfonylureas, sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors, and thiazolidinediones.
Acarbose (Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitor) and metformin are of T2DM medications.
Pompe disease is a progressive, debilitating and often fatal neuromuscular disease caused by a genetic deficiency or dysfunction of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) affecting an estimated 50,000 people worldwide.
These sugars are further digested to monosaccharide by the action of alpha-glucosidase. The current alpha-amylase and glucosidase inhibitors in clinical use are associated with side effects such as hypoglycemia, diarrhea, flatulence, and bowel bloating that limit their use in the treatment of diabetes and its complications [5].