adrenergic

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ad·re·ner·gic

(ad-rĕ-ner'jik),
1. Relating to nerve cells or fibers of the autonomic nervous system that use norepinephrine as their neurotransmitter. Compare: cholinergic.
2. Relating to drugs that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system.
[adren- + G. ergon, work]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

adrenergic

(ăd′rə-nûr′jĭk)
adj.
1. Activated by or capable of releasing epinephrine or a similar substance, especially in the sympathetic nervous system: adrenergic receptors.
2. Having physiological effects similar to those of epinephrine: an adrenergic amine.

ad′re·ner′gi·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Adrenergic

adjective Referring to
(1) Neural activation by catecholamines—e.g., adrenaline/epinephrine, noradrenaline/norepinephrine, dopamine.
(2) Sympathetic nerve fibres that liberate catecholamines into a synapse.
noun Any agent with adrenergic-agonist activity.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

adrenergic

adjective Referring to
1. Neural activation by catecholamines–eg, epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine. See Biogenic amines, Neurotransmitters, Sympathetic nervous system.
2. Sympathetic nerve fibers that liberate epinephrine or norepinephrine into a synapse noun Any agent with adrenergic–agonist activity.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ad·re·ner·gic

(ad'rĕ-nĕr'jik)
1. Relating to nerve cells or fibers of the autonomic nervous system that employ norepinephrine as their neurotransmitter.
Compare: cholinergic
2. Relating to drugs that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system.
See: alpha (α)-adrenergic receptors, beta (β)-adrenergic receptors
[adren- + G. ergon, work]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

adrenergic

Having effects similar to those of ADRENALINE. Drugs with adrenaline-like action are called adrenergic. A nerve which releases noradrenaline (a substance closely related to adrenaline) at its endings to pass on its impulses to other nerves, or to muscle fibres, is described as an adrenergic nerve.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

adrenergic

(of nerve endings) secreting ADRENALINE and NORADRENALINE on the arrival of a NERVE IMPULSE. These substances then stimulate the effector nerve fibres in the SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM of many vertebrates in much the same way as ACETYLCHOLINE acts as a transmitter substance in CHOLINERGIC nerve fibres.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Adrenergic

Activated by adrenalin (norepinephrine), loosely applied to the sympathetic nervous system responses.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

adrenergic 

1. Relating to a neuron that is activated or capable of releasing adrenaline (epinephrine).
2. Having an effect similar to adrenaline (epinephrine).
3. Relating to drugs that mimic the effects of the sympathetic nervous system (sympathomimetic drugs).
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

ad·re·ner·gic

(ad'rĕ-nĕr'jik)
1. Relating to nerve cells or fibers of the autonomic nervous system that use norepinephrine as their neurotransmitter.
2. Relating to drugs that mimic actions of the sympathetic nervous system.
[adren- + G. ergon, work]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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