alpha-linolenic acid

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Related to Alpha linolenic acid: eicosapentaenoic acid, Alpha lipoic acid

alpha-linolenic acid

C18H30O2, an omega-3 fatty acid derived from plants, esp. seeds (canola oil, flaxseed, walnuts and pumpkins) and from some fish (salmon and mackerel).
CAS # 463-40-1
See also: acid
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of fatty acid composition with different concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and alpha linolenic acid (ALA) combination in Tris extender of frozen-thawed bull sperm (Mean % +- SEM, n=24).
89 for high intake of alpha linolenic acid from either animal (meat or dairy) or vegetable sources, 1.
The study published in the latest issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that salad dressings and mayonnaise contain alpha linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid, that has protective effects against heart disease.
Eleven articles (13,323 breast cancer events and 687,770 participants) investigated fish intake, 17 articles in vestigated marine n-3 PUFA (16,178 breast cancer events and 527,392 participants) and 12 articles investigated alpha linolenic acid (14,284 breast cancer events and 405,592 participants).
Walnuts are a rich source of fibre, antioxidants, and unsaturated fatty acids, particularly alpha linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid.
Propanal, the primary aldehyde of alpha linolenic acid degradation, was observed by the scientists in samples stored at room temperature for four months.
Produced from pure, premium flax seed oil, first cold pressed with a high content (60%) of Alpha Linolenic Acid, they are excellent for supplementing the fatty acid content in foods and nutraceuticals.
Pizzey's produces and markets nutritional ingredients predominantly derived from flaxseed, a source of plant-based omega 3 fatty acids, specifically alpha linolenic acid (ALA).
Depending on which desaturases are activated, and the growth conditions scientists create, the yeast's metabolism converts the lipids into valuable byproducts, such as alpha eleostearic acid, which is a main tung oil component, and alpha linolenic acid.