Alma-Ata Declaration

Alma-Ata Declaration

(al′mă ă-tah′) [Capital of Kazakhstan]
A declaration made in 1978 at the Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata, USSR. It stated that primary health care is the key to attaining health for all by the year 2000. Eight elements were defined as essential to this: education, food supply, safe water, maternal and child health (including family planning), immunization, prevention and control of endemic diseases, appropriate treatment of common diseases and injuries, and provision of essential drugs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abel Salinas Rivas, said today that the participation of the National Academy of Medicine in the updating of the Alma-Ata Declaration, which in 1978 defined primary care as a set of values ?
At various opportunities and including the Alma-Ata Declaration, there were signs of its belonging in relation to the guidance towards NIEO (32).
One reason for the longevity of the CIS is the fact that, according to the Alma-Ata Declaration, signed on 21 December 1991 in the then capital of Kazakhstan.
One major factor responsible for the failure of primary health care in many countries in Africa since the Alma-Ata declaration is the lack of effective strategies for implementation.
Just how successful has the Alma-Ata Declaration been in addressing issues of inequality in health?
The World Health Organization (WHO), in its 2008 World Health Report, rekindling the spirit of the Alma-Ata Declaration (1978) which mobilized a "Primary Health Care movement" around the world more than thirty years ago, called for a renewal of primary care to achieve healthcare for all in the globalized world.
The PAHO/ WHO definition of UHC described above is linked to the 1978 Alma-Ata Declaration, which advocated health promotion, appropriate use of resources, intersectoral action, and moreover universal access to health, where all people have equitable use of appropriate, timely, good-quality health services, and the role of the state, as well as safe, effective, and affordable good-quality medicines (1).
Yet, during the last three decades, after Alma-Ata declaration and development of the millennium goals by the World Health Organization (WHO)2 a decade before in 2000, have not been able to accomplish the rights of equitable health care for all of the people living on the planet earth, especially in developing countries.
The Alma-Ata Declaration explicitly outlines comprehensive primary health care as an approach that addresses the social, economic and political causes of poor health and nutrition [16].
Over three decades ago, signatories to the Alma-Ata Declaration noted that Health for All would contribute not only to a better quality of life but also to global peace and security.
The two-day visit is aimed at attending the International Conference on the 30th Anniversary of Alma-Ata Declaration of WHO/UNICEF on Primary Health Care.
1) The development and implementation of community health worker (CHW) programmes grew during the 1970s and 1980s, following the Alma-Ata Declaration (2) and in response to the inadequate provision of primary health care under apartheid.