Alma-Ata Declaration

Alma-Ata Declaration

(al′mă ă-tah′) [Capital of Kazakhstan]
A declaration made in 1978 at the Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata, USSR. It stated that primary health care is the key to attaining health for all by the year 2000. Eight elements were defined as essential to this: education, food supply, safe water, maternal and child health (including family planning), immunization, prevention and control of endemic diseases, appropriate treatment of common diseases and injuries, and provision of essential drugs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contrary to the claims of Armenia, the states that signed the Alma-Ata Declaration of December 21, 1991, on the goals and principles of the Commonwealth of Independent States, including Armenia, accepted the obligation to recognize and respect the territorial integrity of each other and the inviolability of existing borders," reads the appeal.
Indeed, cooperation with the World Health Organisation has been a consistent approach for His Royal Highness the Prime Minister since the adoption of the Alma-Ata Declaration in 1978.
In Rwanda, family medicine and community health, which are the better adapted strategies to address these problems, were "de-prioritized" on the grounds that "new medical graduates opting to join the health workforce as general practitioners (rather than pursue specialty training) were felt to already possess the proper knowledge and skills required to deliver basic medical, surgical, and obstetrical services." Forty years after the Alma-Ata Declaration, (2) there is a renewed call to give primary care services a higher priority (3) and to equip health workers, physicians in particular, with competencies in health promotion, prevention of evitable illness, and treatment of problems such as those mentioned above.
(1) This is a direct echo of the 1978 Alma-Ata declaration to promote world health through primary health care (PHC).
In October 2018, WHO co-hosted a major global conference in Astana, Kazakhstan at which all countries committed to renew the commitment to primary health care made in the Alma-Ata declaration in 1978.
Many consider this 'Alma-Ata Declaration' among the critical public health milestones of the 20th century, signaling a global commitment to make quality health care universally accessible by bringing it down to the community.
Many consider this "Alma-Ata Declaration" among the critical public health milestones of the 20th century, signaling a global commitment to make quality healthcare universally accessible, by bringing it down to the community.
"The year 2018 is also the 40th anniversary of the historic Alma-Ata Declaration, and due to our collective efforts, the Region is better prepared, and is accelerating progress toward the shared global vision of health for all through universal health coverage," he added.
According to the Alma-Ata Declaration, primary healthcare should include health education, maternal and child health services, among other, as well as provide treatment for common diseases.
In 1978, 3,000 delegates from 134 countries and 67 international organizations met in Alma-Ata, Kazakhstan, to discuss and approve what would become the Alma-Ata Declaration (Cueto 2004).
figure By DAVID KITAVI A widely accepted definition of a community health worker proposed by a World Health Organisation (WHO) Study Group (1989) is: Community health workers (CHWs) should be members of the communities where they work, should be selected by the communities, should be answerable to the communities for their activities, should be supported by the health system, but not necessarily a part of its organisation, and have shorter training than professional workers.Since Alma-Ata Declaration of 1978, the CHWs have acted as a link between the community and health systems.