Alma-Ata Declaration

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Alma-Ata Declaration

(al′mă ă-tah′) [Capital of Kazakhstan]
A declaration made in 1978 at the Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata, USSR. It stated that primary health care is the key to attaining health for all by the year 2000. Eight elements were defined as essential to this: education, food supply, safe water, maternal and child health (including family planning), immunization, prevention and control of endemic diseases, appropriate treatment of common diseases and injuries, and provision of essential drugs.
References in periodicals archive ?
'It was also mentioned in Alma Ata Declaration 1978 that governments should focus on primary healthcare system,' he said.
Pakistan is signatory to the Alma Ata Declaration of 1978.
Health for All, described as "a call for action in the area of social justice", picks up on the theme for the Alma Ata declaration of 1978.
Last year was a significant year for public health as we celebrated 70 years of the WHO's existence and the 40th anniversary of the Alma Ata Declaration that called for urgent and effective national and international action to develop and implement primary health care throughout the world, and particularly in developing countries.
They communicate identity and were the sole identifying motivating factor of naturopaths' inclusion by the World Health Organization, in the development of the Alma Ata declaration at Asanta (6).
World Health Organization (WHO) observed 30th year of Alma Ata Declaration in 2008 giving a clear message i.e.
World Health Day this year coincides with two special events - the seventieth anniversary of the establishment of WHO and the fortieth anniversary of the Alma Ata Declaration on Primary Health Care".
It's also the 40th anniversary of the Alma Ata Declaration - an opportunity to reaffirm that people-centered primary care must be the foundation of our efforts to achieve universal health coverage.
The Philippines also signed the Alma Ata Declaration in 1978, which states that 'governments have a responsibility for the health of their people, which can be fulfilled only by the provision of adequate health and social measures.' Why is it then that in our country, data show that children born to the poorest 20 percent of families are 10 times more at risk of dying than children born to the richest 20 percent?
(11) Retrospectively, the Alma Ata Declaration can be seen as essentially a call for global solidarity: "All countries should cooperate in a spirit of partnership and service to ensure primary healthcare for all people, since the attainment of health by people in any one country directly concerns and benefits every other country." (3)
Taking this into account, the year 1978 marked the assertion of the Alma Ata Declaration at the Geneva International Conference on the Primary Health Care.