allotrope

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al·lo·trope

(al'ō-trōp), Do not confuse this word with allotope.
One of several forms, differing in physical properties, that an element may assume; for example, carbon black, graphite, and diamonds are all allotropes of pure carbon.
[allo- + G. tropos, a turning]

al·lo·trope

(al'ō-trōp)
An element in one of the allotropic forms that it may assume.
[allo- + G. tropos, a turning]
References in periodicals archive ?
EPA considers substances to have different molecular identities when they have different molecular formulas; have the same molecular formulas, but have different atom connectivities; have the same molecular formulas and atom connectivities, but have different spatial arrangements of atoms; have the same type of atoms, but have different crystal lattices, (26) are different allotropes (27) of the same element, or have different isotopes (28) of the same elements.
As a chemical term, allotropic means "having different physical properties, though unchanged in substance" (OED), such as diamonds and coal both being allotropes of carbon.
Curiously, ironically, it is deeply bound up with that unmodulated craving for perfection that often goes under the name of idealism but really is one of the more destructive allotropes of sentimentality.
One can also probe physical properties, including molecular orientation, degree of crystallinity, polymorphs or allotropes, crystal and domain size, crystal defects, and stress/strain.
The ropes might well be the allotropes of puppet strings, even if the dependent manikins in Two Standing Nudes and The Strange Man are stringless.
But allotropy is a property special to (dependent on) allotropes and should appear only under allotropes.
Carbon in all its many forms--diamonds, graphite, fullerenes, coal, and other allotropes, including solid, liquid, gaseous, and plasma forms--may join silicon as a key and virtually inexhaustible resource.
Special emphasis is placed on a comprehensive discussion of cobaltite properties in different allotropes, such as trigonal, hexagonal and Ruddlesden-Popper type.