alloimmune

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al·lo·im·mune

(al'ō-im-yūn'),
Immune to an allogenic antigen.
[allo- + immune]

alloimmune

/al·lo·im·mune/ (al″o-ĭ-mūn´) specifically immune to an allogeneic antigen.

alloimmune

adjective Relating to alloimmunization or a nonself immune reaction

al·lo·im·mune

(al'ō-im-yūn')
Immune to an allogenic antigen.
[allo- + immune]

alloimmune

immunity to an alloantigen.

alloimmune hemolytic anemia of the newborn
occurs in humans, where it is also called Rh disease, in foals as a naturally occurring disease, and in pigs and cattle receiving vaccines containing allotypic red blood cell antigens. In naturally occurring Rh-like syndrome, there are usually no untoward consequences for the first pregnancy, but at parturition red blood cells from the offspring enter the maternal circulation and, if the red blood cell antigens differ from the dam, result in the production of antibodies. A subsequent pregnancy from the same mating in which an offspring of the same blood type is produced will result in a hemolytic anemia in the offspring when maternal antibodies are acquired in the colostrum.
Enlarge picture
Hemolytic anemia of the newborn. By permission from Tizard IR, Veterinary Immunology An Introduction, Saunders, 2001
References in periodicals archive ?
2]/[micro]L at 1 hour on day 5, a platelet refractory panel was requested to evaluate antibody mediated alloimmunity as a cause of platelet refractoriness.
9) In addition, previous reports have indicated that immunological problems involving autoimmunity, (10,11) alloimmunity (12) and embryotoxic factors (13) are associated with EPL.
This article, based in part on an invited talk at the Annual International Conference of Saudi Society of Nephrology & Transplantation in 2012, reviews current notions of the emerging field of innate alloimmunity by highlighting novel thoughts regarding future immunosuppressive therapy in organ transplantation.
Another experimental approach examines the role of alloimmunity in HIV.
In Rhesus alloimmunity the mother develops antibodies that attack and destroy the red blood cells of her unborn baby.
These scientists call for vaccine developers to look into immunizations based on a phenomenon called alloimmunity.
The colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri Pallas is widely employed in studies on invertebrate alloimmunity (reviewed by Weissman et al.