alliteration

(redirected from Alliterative Revival)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

al·lit·er·a·tion

(ă-lit-er-ā'shŭn),
In psychiatry, a speech disturbance in which words commencing with the same sounds, usually consonants, are notably frequent.
[Fr. allitération, fr. L. ad, to, + littera, letter of alphabet]

alliteration

(ă-lit″ĕ-rā′shŏn) [L. alliteratio]
A speech disorder in which words beginning with the same consonant sound are used to excess.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
49) Chism, Alliterative Revivals, 161; for the literary history of Maria's cannibalism, see Merrall Llewelyn Price, "Imperial Violence and the Monstrous Mother: Cannibalism at the Siege of Jerusalem,' Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts, ed.
Phyllis Moe (Heidelberg: Winter, 1977); for more on the Augustinian doctrine of toleration, see Narin van Court, "The Siege of Jerusalem and Recuperative Readings," 164-5; "The Siege of Jerusalem and Augustinian Historians," 227-48; Chism, Alliterative Revivals, 156-60.