alliteration

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al·lit·er·a·tion

(ă-lit-er-ā'shŭn),
In psychiatry, a speech disturbance in which words commencing with the same sounds, usually consonants, are notably frequent.
[Fr. allitération, fr. L. ad, to, + littera, letter of alphabet]

alliteration

(ă-lit″ĕ-rā′shŏn) [L. alliteratio]
A speech disorder in which words beginning with the same consonant sound are used to excess.
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References in periodicals archive ?
All these techniques are a direct off-shoot of Zimmer's participation in the 20th-century alliterative revival, and the closest any critic has come to noticing (at least in print) is a short comment by linguist and Celticist Alexei Kondratiev in praise of Zimmer's "use of discreet alliteration and metric prose" (56).
What, then, is Zimmer's place within the 20th-century alliterative revival? Well, on one hand, his poems have hit upon the original idea of employing an archaic meter, minus any Eurocentric archaisms, to represent a non-Western people with dignity and grace.
But the publishers insist that the book's centre is the fourteenth-century Alliterative Revival in England: seven essays deal, in whole or in part, with each of the poems of Cotton Nero A.
(65) Thorlac Turville-Petre, The Alliterative Revival (Cambridge: D.
Recent readings of the poem that see the text as condemning Arthur's martial and imperial actions include Christine Chism, Alliterative Revivals (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002), pp.