alliteration

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al·lit·er·a·tion

(ă-lit-er-ā'shŭn),
In psychiatry, a speech disturbance in which words commencing with the same sounds, usually consonants, are notably frequent.
[Fr. allitération, fr. L. ad, to, + littera, letter of alphabet]

alliteration

(ă-lit″ĕ-rā′shŏn) [L. alliteratio]
A speech disorder in which words beginning with the same consonant sound are used to excess.
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Thirdly, in a triple alliteration on consecutive words, one of the alliterations is an unstressed syllable in the middle:
In another example, we find two pairs of alliterations on stressed syllables in one line, with a third pair if one counts the unstressed and stressed can come (though one might read it as a spondee) and with an echo from devil to evil:
This sort of echoing need not be simply lexical (a repeated word or phrase), or imagistic (a common metaphor), or discursive (the repetition of similar ideas); instead it may involve, in addition to these, repeated and varied patterns of rhythm, secondary sounds (alliteration, assonance, or consonance), or syntax.
Obviously, this definition and its refinements are meant to apply to verse, where alliteration is a widely encountered tool and where it is used to most conspicuous advantage, but there is no reason why the definition cannot also be applied to prose, providing that certain adjustments are made, such as extending "line" to include the less tightly organized syntactic units of the second mode, and adopting a more flexible description of effect, one that takes into account the more diffuse (and therefore perhaps even more subtle and complex) interaction of sound and meaning it employs.
For example, the weak alliteration of "bitter little embryos spying upon the love life of their parents" (NY) is brought out much more forcefully in the new versions by the addition of "natural nooks," which not only draws attention to itself but also compels a different reading of its immediate context, even to the point of rejuvenating the "dead alliteration" of the cliche "love life": "bitter little embryos spying, from their natural nooks, upon the love life of their parents" (CE, SM).
Another feature of Nabokov's alliteration is his frequent use of what might be called "suballiterative echoing": his combination of voiced consonants with their voiceless counterparts, and vice versa.
Weiskott and Cornelius have also failed to notice that alliteration played a key role in determining the rhythmical possibilities of Old and late Middle English verses.
Consequently, the sporadic and irregular use of alliteration in the Brut and related works, along with their concomitant rhythmically extravagant off-verses, is a clear indication that they do not belong to the classical tradition of alliterative composition.
Except for alliteration and four-stress lines, Zimmer really follows none of these strictures.
The sense of his lines often stops at the line's end, rather than continuing onward through enjambment: another characteristic of Middle English alliteration. Indeed, if Zimmer hadn't championed Tolkien and Anderson so fiercely while never once mentioning W.H.
While it is undesirable to have a B with single alliteration on the second stress alone, analogous to the A3s, it is not impossible to construct Bs analogous to doubly alliterating As like Gewat tha ofer waegholm (217a).
In other words, the word that rises out of the B dip virtually has to have categorical stress as well as alliteration. This is not so in A3s, apparently because it is easier to raise a word without categorical stress to stress out of the beginning of a dip than midway through one.