alliteration

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al·lit·er·a·tion

(ă-lit-er-ā'shŭn),
In psychiatry, a speech disturbance in which words commencing with the same sounds, usually consonants, are notably frequent.
[Fr. allitération, fr. L. ad, to, + littera, letter of alphabet]

alliteration

(ă-lit″ĕ-rā′shŏn) [L. alliteratio]
A speech disorder in which words beginning with the same consonant sound are used to excess.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But in more complex passages, Shakespeare uses sets of alliterative consonance to overlap, spread out over several lines, as in the following, where repeated words and alliteration echo throughout and emphasize the consonance of sound and sense:
Those reverberations find in this scene a general counterpart in a particularly rich echoic language enhanced by alliterative consonance, some near alliterative consonance, and normal alliteration.
2, in a single line, the king links the noble captain's words and deeds through a triple alliteration and an alliterative consonance.
As Macbeth's life is linked to his dearest partner in greatness, so his speech is linked to hers by alliteration and alliterative consonance as well as by rhyme:
Among the examples of alliteration listed above are a few fairly self-contained items that illustrate many of these rhetorical and semantic conditions at once, and that, because of their unusually successful marriage of sound and meaning, may be discussed independently of their contexts.
The other example of alliteration is perhaps not so involved as the one just discussed, but it does typify certain aspects of acoustic manipulation that are important to Nabokov.
The themes, the organization of the imagery with its alternative and parallel figures, its obvious and even emphatic contrivance, and especially the style with its heavy alliteration and punning and resultant tendency to subvert the literality of the discourse by exposing its ligaments, all combine to give this paragraph a specific identity, a characteristic fusion of form and meaning, and to impart to it, at a deeper, tacit level, a certain ironic provisionality, an implication that there is, to adapt a phrase from R.
For example, the lightly ironical "short of suicide" (an irony produced by the incongruity between the surface meaning and the lexical and acoustic form) is rendered by "kazhetsia, krome samoubiistva" ("I think, besides suicide"), where the primary alliteration is shifted from the following noun to the preceding verb but continues to serve the same stylistic function of removing the sting of "samoubiistva" ("suicide," genitive singular), a word with connotations obviously no less ominous than those in English.
Even when the A3 verse, which by definition has only single alliteration, is immediately followed by monosyllables in the off-verse, it resists acquiring the alliterating monosyllable that would make it a type B:
The alliteration on gemunde ratherthan on goda in 758a makes it a type A rather than an A3.
These are the type B1s with single alliteration in the on-verse that have as their last word a word without inevitable categorical stress:
51) notes that with the B that ends in a monosyllable, double alliteration is 'rare', though he does not develop the consequences of this for disambiguating lineation.