all-cause mortality


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all-cause mortality

All of the deaths that occur in a population, regardless of the cause. It is measured in clinical trials and used as an indicator of the safety or hazard of an intervention.
See: disease-specific mortality
See also: mortality
References in periodicals archive ?
Follow-Up and All-Cause Mortality. During a mean follow-up of 246.31 [+ or -] 49.16 days, 168 (7.32%) patients died from all causes.
To evaluate the association between SLC2A9 genotype and cancer incidence and all-cause mortality, we used a Cox proportional hazards regression model with entry at examination and age as the time scale.
Low SES and frailty additively contributed to increased all-cause mortality (Figure 1); their impact was highest in the low SES plus frailty group, followed by the high SES plus frailty, low SES plus nonfrailty, and high SES plus nonfrailty group in order.
All-cause mortality in this modified intention-to-treat group, as well as in the group of patients found to have proven or probable invasive aspergillosis, specifically, supported the study's primary findings (Lancet 2016 Feb:387:760-9).
Accounting for 3.8% of all-cause mortality in this study, sitting is shortening the lives of people across the world.
The authors' show that there is evidence of a reduction in mortality in only 30% of the disease-specific mortality estimates and 11% of the all-cause mortality estimates from the randomised controlled trials they evaluated.
Five trials contributed coronary heart disease events with pooled relative risk (RR) for calcium of 1.02; 17 trials contributed to all-cause mortality data with pooled RR for calcium of 0.96.
The results could also be an artefact; in most studies, the lowest all-cause mortality was seen in patients with a BMI of 22 - 25, but the 'normal' range also includes people with a BMI of 18.5 - 22 who have a higher mortality.
Three studies found an increased all-cause mortality associated with insulin therapy; the fourth and largest study did not find an associated increase in mortality, but did not find a decrease, either.
Associations of whole-grain, refined-grain, and fruit and vegetable consumption with risks of all-cause mortality and incident coronary artery disease and ischemic stroke: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
The study concludes, "Attempted weight loss is associated with lower all-cause mortality, independent of weight change...
A study from The Cooper Institute, Dallas, Tex., shows that using body mass index (BMI) to predict the risk of all-cause mortality in women may be misleading unless cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) levels are taken into account.