alienation

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alienation

 [āl″yen-a´shun]
1. estrangement from society; feelings of being an outsider, foreigner, or outcast.
2. estrangement from one's self; feelings of unreality or depersonalization.
3. alienation of affect; isolation of ideas from feelings, avoidance of emotional situations, and other efforts to estrange one's self from one's feelings.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·li·en·a·tion

(ā-lē-en-ā'shŭn),
A condition characterized by a lack of meaningful relationships with others, sometimes resulting in depersonalization and estrangement from others.
[L. alieno, pp. -atus, to make strange]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

alienation

(āl′yə-nā′shən, ā′lē-ə-)
n.
1. The act of alienating or the condition of being alienated; estrangement: Alcoholism often leads to the alienation of family and friends.
2. Emotional isolation or dissociation.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
(1) The feeling of being apart from or unattached to others; estrangement felt in a setting viewed as foreign, unpredictable, or unacceptable, as occurs in depersonalization; the sensation that one has been removed from friends, family or one’s usual social setting; cultural estrangement
(2) The sense of being removed from one’s own emotions—alienation of affect
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

alienation

Psychiatry
1. The sensation that one has been removed from friends, family or one's usual social setting; cultural estrangement. See Depersonalization.
2. The sense of being removed from one's own emotions–alienation of affect.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

a·li·en·a·tion

(ā'lē-ĕn-ā'shŭn)
A condition characterized by lack of meaningful relationships with others, sometimes resulting in depersonalization and estrangement from others.
[L. alieno, pp. -atus, to make strange]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

alienation

1. A state of estrangement from, or inability to relate to, other people, concepts, social norms, or even oneself. Alienation, especially of the latter type, may be a feature of psychiatric disorder, but equally it may result from an accurate perception of the social environment.
2. A feeling that one's thoughts and emotions are under the control of someone else or that others have access to one's mind. One of the symptoms of SCHIZOPHRENIA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Patient discussion about alienation

Q. my dad has msa, he has recently started seeing things, eg aliens, government consp.ext not fully reconzing lov does not reconize loved ones while having these episodes, becomes anxious and ill manered just not like my dad at all, he's so quite and polite normally.

A. Multi Systems Atrophy = MSA

Try this:
http://www.credencegroup.co.uk/Eclub/ses/sessearch.php?q=atrophy&pvdc=0
Get in touch with the credence group - they know very very much.

More discussions about alienation
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References in periodicals archive ?
Alienation Effects: Performance and Self-Management in Yugoslavia, 1945-91
Presently, she was writing a critique on Bertolt Brecht's "Alienation Effects in Chinese Acting" and was finalizing an experimental poetry thesis filled with reverse fables in which little girls speak in the personae of the most hapless and vilified of animals.
The interruption of tradition, which is for us now a fair accompli, opens an era in which no link is possible between old and new, if not the infinite accumulation of the old in a sort of monstrous archive or the alienation effected by the very means that is supposed to help with the transmission of the old.
Hence the poignancy and resonance, the moving quality that would seem to be so much at odds with the Brechtian alienation effects Hartley employs.
Dr Sokolova does not attempt to answer this question; but he does know that Shakespeare's romances are ~interrogative' because they ask us jolly tricky questions and employ Brechtian alienation effects to signal these.