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algorithm

 [al´go-rithm]
1. a series of algebraic equations.
2. a logical progression that is programmed for a computer.
3. a model for making decisions.
Algorithm. Model of a decision algorithm. ACC/AHA Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Unstable Angina and Non-ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction. JACC 2000, 36: 970-1062. Copyright 2000, by the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association. Permission granted for one time use. Further reproduction is not permitted without permission of the ACC/AHA.

al·go·rithm

(al'gō-ridhm),
A systematic process consisting of an ordered sequence of steps, each step depending on the outcome of the previous one. In clinical medicine, a step-by-step protocol for management of a health care problem; in computed tomography, the formulas used to calculate the final image from the transmitted x-ray data.
[Mediev. L. algorismus, after Muhammad ibn-Musa al-Khwarizmi, Arabian mathematician, + G. arithmos, number]

algorithm

(1) A sequential procedure for solving a mathematical problem.
(2) A step-by-step procedure for reaching a decision when choosing among multiple alternative options, linked to each other by a decision tree.

algorithm

Decision-making A logical set of rules for solving a specific problem, which assumes that all of the data is objective, that there are a finite number of solutions to the problem, and that there are logical steps that must be performed to arrive at each of those solutions NIHspeak A step-by-step procedure for solving a problem; a formula. See Back-propagation, Critical pathway, Genetic algorithm, Risk of ovarian cancer algorithm.

al·go·rithm

(al'gŏr-idhm)
1. A process consisting of steps, each depending on the outcome of the previous one.
2. clinical medicine A step-by-step protocol for management of a health care problem.
3. computed tomography The formulas used for calculation of the final image from the x-ray transmission data.
[Mediev. L. algorismus, after Muhammad ibn-Musa al-Khwarizmi, Persian mathematician, + G. arithmos, number]

al·go·rithm

(al'gŏr-idhm)
A systematic process consisting of an ordered sequence of steps, each step depending on the outcome of the previous one.
[Mediev. L. algorismus, after Muhammad ibn-Musa al-Khwarizmi, Persian mathematician, + G. arithmos, number]
References in periodicals archive ?
Along the path, we will have transmuted nonalgorithmic notation into algorithmic substitutes.
Algorithmics offered solution fits to our strategic risk objectives which will cater both to the short and long term business undertakings.
For example, mechanism design as originally developed in Economics is not concerned with computational issues such as algorithmic or communication complexity.
Algorithmics's risk analytics software, content and advisory services are used by banks, investment and insurance businesses to help assess risk, address regulatory requirements and make more insightful business decisions.
Multiagent Systems: Algorithmic, Game-Theoretic and Logical Foundations.
(2000) Reordering the Reorderable Matrix as an algorithmic problem.
* We end with a conclusion pinpointing some extensions (limit laws, algorithmic considerations, extension to infinite systems, or systems involving entire functions).
The [O.sup.*]-notation (also: "soft-O-notation") is a similar notation that is often used in exponential algorithmics [14, 38].
21 October 2011 - IBM (NYSE:IBM) said on Friday it had completed its USD380.2m (EUR275.6m) purchase of Canadian risk analytics software provider Algorithmics as part of plans to boost its analytics offering for the financial sector.
M2 EQUITYBITES-October 21, 2011-IBM acquires Algorithmics for USD380.2m(C)2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
Provider of enterprise risk management solutions and services Algorithmics, a subsidiary of Fimalac (Euronext: FIM), has acquired VIPitech from Towers Watson.
(4) Narrow-AI has advanced algorithmics hugely, for instance we can now solve Boolean satisfaction problems with hundreds of thousands of variables.

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