alginate

(redirected from Alginates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

alginate

 [al´jĭ-nāt]
a salt of alginic acid, a colloidal substance from brown seaweed; used, in the form of calcium, sodium, or ammonium alginate, for dental impression materials.

al·gi·nate

(al'ji-nāt),
An irreversible hydrocolloid consisting of salts of alginic acid, a colloidal acid polysaccharide obtained from seaweed and composed of mannuronic acid residues; used in dental impression materials.

alginate

/al·gi·nate/ (al´jĭ-nāt) a salt of alginic acid; water-soluble alginates are useful as materials for dental impressions.

alginate

[al′ji·nāt]
a salt of alginic acid, extracted from marine kelp. The calcium, sodium, and ammonium alginates have been used in foam, cloth, a thickening agent for foods, pharmaceutical preparations, and gauze for absorbent surgical dressings. Soluble alginates, such as those of sodium, potassium, or magnesium, form a viscous sol that can be changed into a gel by a chemical reaction with compounds such as calcium sulfate; this makes them useful as materials for taking dental impressions.

alginate

A gelatinous polysaccharide extract from brown algae and salt of alginic acid, which is a linear polymer of mannuronic and glucuronic acids, found in the cell walls of algae. It is widely used in processed foods and in medicinal, industrial and household products, including swabs, filters and fire retardants.

Source
Laminaria spp and Macrocystis pyrifera; a chemically different version of algin is produced by the bacterium Azobacter vinelandii.
 
Dentistry
Alginate can be formulated with gypsum into a plaster like compound to take impressions for crown and bridgework.
 
Surgery
Alginates are used as foam, clotting agents and gauze in absorbable surgical dressings and packing.
 
Wound care
Alginate dressings are derived from seaweed made of soft non-woven fibres, and are available as pads, ropes or ribbons. Alginate dressings are extremely lightweight, absorb many times their own weight, form a gel-like covering over the wound, and maintain a moist environment. They are best used for wounds with significant exudate.

Pros
Especially useful for packing exudative wounds; do not physically inhibit wound contraction as does gauze; highly absorbent.
 
Cons
Requires a secondary dressing; too drying if wound has little exudate.

al·gi·nate

(al'ji-nāt)
An irreversible hydrocolloid consisting of salts of alginic acid, a colloidal acid polysaccharide obtained from seaweed and composed of mannuronic acid residues; used in dental impression materials.

al·gi·nate

(al'ji-nāt)
Elastic dental impression material composed of potassium alginate from kelp, calcium sulfate, and other ingredients; usually a powder to mix with water. Setting reaction cross-links alginic acid to form a semisolid.

alginate (al´jināt),

n a salt of alginic acid (e.g., sodium alginate), which, when mixed with water in accurate proportions, forms an irreversible hydrocolloid gel used for making impressions or molds of the denti-tion. See also hydrocolloid, irreversible.

alginate

a salt of alginic acid, a colloidal substance from brown seaweed; used, in the form of calcium, sodium or ammonium alginate, as foam, clot or gauze for absorbable surgical dressings. Also used as an irreversible hydrocolloid impression material in dentistry for making impressions of jaws in the preparation of orthodontic appliances.
References in periodicals archive ?
TABLE 1: FIVE (GROUPS) COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE NEWER ALGINATES TESTED IN THIS STUDY
The annual consumption of alginate by different industrial sectors is 30,000 metric tons, particularly in food sector as a viscosifier, stabilizer, thickener, emulsifier, gelling and water binding agent (Lakshmipriyad et al.
In this study, urease was isolated from Aspergillus fumigatus and immobilized in calcium alginate beads for the first time in literature.
The presented modification of this dyeing process utilizes alkyl silanes acting as anchor molecules between the modified alginates and the polymeric fibers.
Therefore, due to the importance of this issue to the area of Food Science and Technology, in this review article, it will be addressed the technological aspects used in the microencapsulation of probiotic cultures using sodium alginate, with emphasis on techniques of internal and external ionic gelation, demonstrating the feasibility of implementation as well as new resources for its improvement.
In this article, you'll learn about a unique approach-known as raft-forming alginate (10) --that provides inclusive relief and protection from this chronic condition that affects so many aging individuals.
The polymer films were obtained from the dispersion of polymers (sodium alginate and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose) in distilled water under environmentally controlled conditions and mechanical agitation at 400 rpm using an RZR 2020 homogenizer (Heildoph).
A higher weight loss was verified in the treatment with sodium alginate at 1% (high) with a loss of 28% in the 12th day of storage in environmental conditions, that is: at room temperature ([+ or -] 25[degrees]C) and 10[degrees]C with 80% RH.
The cell suspension was slowly added to ether sterilized sodium alginate (2, 3 and 5% iv/v) and mixed thoroughly with sterile glass rod.
1 shows that the structure of sodium alginate NO4 600 elements includes dispersed particles of irregular shapes, sizes ranging from 20 to 250 [micro]m.
Researchers investigated the ability of alginate to reduce fat breakdown by a digestive enzyme, pancreatic lipase.
Alginates are made up of long chains of sugars, guluronate and mannuronate.