algae

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algae

 [al´je]
a group of plants living in the water, including all seaweeds, and ranging in size from microscopic cells to fronds hundreds of feet long.
blue-green algae former name for members of the group now called Cyanobacteria.

al·gae

(al'jē),
A division of eukaryotic, photosynthetic, nonflowering organisms that includes many seaweeds.
[pl. of L. alga, seaweed]

al·gae

(al'jē)
A division of eukaryotic, photosynthetic, nonflowering organisms that includes many seaweeds.
[pl. of L. alga, seaweed]

algae

a collective term for several taxonomic groups of plants, namely Charophyta, Chlorophyta, Chrysophyta, Euglenophyta, Phaeophyta, Pyrrophyta and Rhodophyta. All are relatively simple photosynthetic forms with unicellular reproductive structures. They range from UNICELLULAR organisms to non-vascular filamentous or thalloid plants. Algae occur in both marine and fresh water, while others are terrestrial, living in damp situations on walls, trees, etc.

Algae

Plants that have one cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based in Audubon, Pennsylvania, Algea Therapies is a division of Globus Medical (NYSE:GMED), a musculoskeletal implant company.
This moral--that reckless men bring upon themselves "miseries that transcend their fate" {hyper moron algea, 1.34)--is reinforced by the poem's opening tableau, in which Zeus complains that mortals unfairly blame the gods for woes caused by their own folly Although gods display "good intentions" (agatha phroncon, 1 .43) and dispatch messengers and omens to deter wrongdoing, willful tools ignore the signs and blame the Olympians when painful consequences ensue.
The subject of the invention is the genetically altered nucleotide sequences of the type disclosed, vectors containing such nucleotide sequences, as well as genetically altered eucaryotic cells, tissue and/or parts of plants, algea and/or fungi and/or regenerated whole plants and the use thereof.
En efecto, partiendo del original, el traductor probablemente no hubiera empleado 'peste' para nousos ('enfermedad'), loimos ('peste'), loigos ('ruina') y algea ('dolores'), entre otros ejemplos.