algae

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algae

 [al´je]
a group of plants living in the water, including all seaweeds, and ranging in size from microscopic cells to fronds hundreds of feet long.
blue-green algae former name for members of the group now called Cyanobacteria.

al·gae

(al'jē),
A division of eukaryotic, photosynthetic, nonflowering organisms that includes many seaweeds.
[pl. of L. alga, seaweed]

al·gae

(al'jē)
A division of eukaryotic, photosynthetic, nonflowering organisms that includes many seaweeds.
[pl. of L. alga, seaweed]

algae

a collective term for several taxonomic groups of plants, namely Charophyta, Chlorophyta, Chrysophyta, Euglenophyta, Phaeophyta, Pyrrophyta and Rhodophyta. All are relatively simple photosynthetic forms with unicellular reproductive structures. They range from UNICELLULAR organisms to non-vascular filamentous or thalloid plants. Algae occur in both marine and fresh water, while others are terrestrial, living in damp situations on walls, trees, etc.

Algae

Plants that have one cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
Earlier studies showed that certain algal proteins (lectins--glycoproteins with ability to agglutinate red blood cells) also work as biotechnological tools in experimental models in vivo and/or in vitro against human pathogenic bacteria (HOLANDA et al., 2005), growth of human pathogen yeasts (CORDEIRO et al., 2006) or on the immune response (ABREU et al., 2012; VANDERLEI et al., 2010).
Further investigations on the digestibility in vivo of these algal proteins could provide data on the degradation process by human and animal gastrointestinal tract enzymes (CHARLES et al., 2007; MABEAU; FLEURENCE, 1993; URBANO; GONI, 2002).
The protein enabled the mice's damaged eyes to send messages to the brain when stimulated by light, but whether the algal protein or electrical stimulation of the entire retina could actually restore vision was unclear.