algal bloom

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algal bloom

an extensive growth of algae in a water body, usually as a result of the phosphate content of fertilizers and detergents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos said, "As DEC continues to develop solutions to address harmful algal blooms in Owasco Lake through the work of our Finger Lakes Water Hub, the Army Corps approval of the necessary permits for the Owasco Flats Restoration Initiative have paved the way for this important project to begin.
Al Jamali confirmed that red tide, an algal bloom that turns seawater red with the density of the algae, has been spotted in Dubai, Sharjah, Umm Al Quwain and Ras Al Khaimah.
When algal blooms adversely affect people or the environment, they are called harmful algal blooms (HABs).
They also show that this algal bloom coincided with a three- to four-fold enrichment in fixed nitrogen in local waters.
Protecting New York's water quality for future generations is our top priority, and we are working with local communities to address the growing threat of harmful algal blooms," Governor Cuomo said.
Dubai: A red tide algal bloom has appeared along the UAE's coastlines in the western regions, confirmed the Ministry of Climate Change and Environment on Wednesday.
Sentinel animals in a One Health approach to harmful cyanobacterial and algal blooms.
The more recent NRW investigations concluded the permitted discharges from our treatment works partly contributed to a complex water quality impact on the lake, which took the form of an algal bloom in 2009, but that the changes to permits already planned by NRW were sufficient to address this.
These impacts stress the importance of understanding HABs and developing tools to mitigate their impacts and ultimately to control or prevent the algal blooms.
Algal blooms are associated with a variety of aquatic organisms capable of using photosynthesis for energy.
US/CANADA An influx of harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie that affected the water systems of Toledo, Ohio residents in 2014 has led to a new way of making sodium-ion batteries.
Algal blooms, which can ultimately rob water of oxygen, are projected to increase 20 percent in lakes over the next century as warming rates increase.