ALE

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ALE

Abbreviation for:
active life expectancy
allowable limits of error
amputated lower extremity
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References in classic literature ?
Twopence-halfpenny,' says the landlord, 'is the price of the Genuine Stunning ale.
Dunstan was waiting for this, and took his ale in shorter draughts than usual.
And they toasted him in nut brown ale, and hailed him as their leader, by the name of Robin Hood.
Poyser's attention was here diverted by the appearance of Molly, carrying a large jug, two small mugs, and four drinking- cans, all full of ale or small beer--an interesting example of the prehensile power possessed by the human hand.
She heard Jonathan Kail's heavy footsteps up and down the stairs till he had done placing the luggage, and heard him express his thanks for the ale her husband took out to him, and for the gratuity he received.
Fifteen there were in all, making themselves merry with feasting and drinking as they sat around a huge pasty, to which each man helped himself, thrusting his hands into the pie, and washing down that which they ate with great horns of ale which they drew all foaming from a barrel that stood nigh.
I shall take a mere mouthful of ham and a glass of ale," he said, reassuringly.
Whilst he was speaking the landlady came in again, bearing a broad platter, upon which stood all the beakers and flagons charged to the brim with the brown ale or the ruby wine.
Conducted to the butler's pantry, Geoffrey requested that functionary to produce a jug of his oldest ale, with appropriate solid nourishment in the shape of "a hunk of bread and cheese.
After some further conversation between the master and mistress relative to the success of Mr Squeers's trip and the people who had paid, and the people who had made default in payment, a young servant girl brought in a Yorkshire pie and some cold beef, which being set upon the table, the boy Smike appeared with a jug of ale.
Millward, upon the introduction of that beverage; 'I'll take a little of your home-brewed ale.
For as this is the liquor of modern historians, nay, perhaps their muse, if we may believe the opinion of Butler, who attributes inspiration to ale, it ought likewise to be the potation of their readers, since every book ought to be read with the same spirit and in the same manner as it is writ.