aldehyde

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Related to Aldehydes: Carboxylic acids

aldehyde

 [al´dĕ-hīd]
an organic compound containing the aldehyde functional group (-CHO); that is, one with a carbonyl group (C=O) located at one end of the carbon chain.

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd),
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (CH2OH) and oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (COOH), for example, acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

/al·de·hyde/ (al´dĕ-hīd)
1. any of a class of organic compounds containing the group —CHO, i.e., one with a carbonyl group (CdbondO) located at one end of the carbon chain.
2. a suffix used to denote a compound occurring in aldehyde conformation.

aldehyde

[al′dəhīd′]
Etymology: Ar, alkohl + L, dehydrogenatum, dehydrogenated
any of a large category of organic compounds derived from the oxidation of a corresponding primary alcohol, as in the conversion of ethyl alcohol to acetaldehyde, also known as ethanal. Each aldehyde is characterized by a carbonyl group (─CO─) attached directly to a hydrogen (─CHO) in its formula and can be converted into a corresponding acid by oxidation, as in the conversion of acetaldehyde to acetic acid.

aldehyde

An organic compound with a formyl group (R-CHO), which is double-bonded to an O2 (i.e., a carbonyl group, C=O), single-bonded to a hydrogen and single-bonded to another group (e.g., methane, benzene, hydrogen, etc.). The aldehydes in some essential oils contribute to their pleasant odoor, including vanillin, cilantro and cinnamaldehyde.

Example
Acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), butyraldehyde (CH3(CH2)2CHO).

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd)
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (-CH2OH), oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (-COOH); e.g., acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

A product of dehydrogenated (metabolized) alcohol, hence the name. Aldehydes cause most of the toxic effects of bibulous overindulgence (hangover).

aldehyde,

n hydrocarbon characterized by strong scent; antiviral, antiinflammatory, and soothing properties. Can irritate skin if administered improperly.
Enlarge picture
Aldehyde.

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd)
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (-CH2OH), oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (-COOH); e.g., acetaldehyde.

aldehyde (al´dəhīd´),

n a large category of organic compounds derived from a corresponding alcohol by the removal of two hydrogen atoms, as in the conversion of ethyl alcohol to acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

an organic compound containing the aldehyde functional group (−CHO); that is, one with a carbonyl group (C=O) located at one end of the carbon chain. Aldehydes are formed in meat during the rancidification of fat and in the degradation of alcohols in biological materials. They have an acrid unpleasant taste and are toxic if taken in sufficient quantities. Some aldehydes (formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde) are used as disinfectants and fixatives.
References in periodicals archive ?
Potentially harmful polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs for short, heterocyclic amines, and higher and mutagenic aldehydes, along with fine and ultrafine particles, have all been found in cooking fumes, using vegetable oils, such as safflower, soya bean, and rapeseed oils, as well as lard.
Grootveld says his tests revealed that fish and chips fried in vegetable oil contained up to 200 times more aldehydes than the safe daily limit set by the World Health Organisation.
He said his research showed "a typical meal of fish and chips", fried in vegetable oil, contained 100 to 200 times more toxic aldehydes than the safe daily limit set by the World Health Organisation.
The tests suggested coconut oil produces the lowest levels of aldehydes, and three times more aldehydes were produced when heating corn oil and sunflower oil than butter.
Since unsaturated fatty acids are known to be precursors of volatile aldehydes (Svedberg et al.
We reported an efficient copper-catalyzed oxidative amidation protocol between aldehydes and amines as well as oxidative esterification reactions.
280), Hollis says that the evidence of the two aldehydes will help researchers understand how molecular building blocks assemble into more-complex organic molecules in space.
The major reactive molecules participating in adduct formation appear to be those that are chemically known as aldehydes, specifically acetaldehyde, MDA, and HNE (Niemela 2001; Tuma and Sorrell 1995).
This molecular sieve is highly selective for adsorbing odor-causing compounds like aldehydes and ketones.
The third reaction is an oxidation process wherein aldehydes are produced.
Discusses thermodynamics and kinetics, the structural information advances from hydrocarbons to alcohols to aldehydes and ketones and, finally, to carboxylic acids
Aldea is pursuing treatment of clinically significant acute alcohol toxicity, Fanconi anemia and other diseases and conditions associated with toxic aldehydes.