Alcoholics Anonymous


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Related to Alcoholics Anonymous: alcoholism, Narcotics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous

A self-help support group for alcoholics, which claims a high rate of long-term abstention, through a structured program as well as personal and group support.

Al·co·hol·ics Anon·y·mous

(AA, aa) (al'kŏ-hol'iks ă-non'i-mŭs)
Mutual support group that helps its members remain sober.
References in periodicals archive ?
Why AA works; the intellectual significance of Alcoholics Anonymous. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 43(01): 38-80.
While she feels religion is bad for her, her desire for structure and the social support of a faith community may portend her later affiliation with Alcoholics Anonymous. Favorable dispositions toward aspects of spirituality/religiousness, such as the Loving God variable examined in this study, may be cloaked in nontraditionally religious terms such as this individual's longing for a supportive community.
As Alcoholics Anonymous grew, Wilson became its principal symbol.
What was it about narrative in Alcoholics Anonymous that allowed people to become the heroes of their own stories, while at the same time conceding a lack of control over many aspects of their lives?
Students also pose spiritual questions that may relate to their "inherited" religious belief systems, spiritual concerns about abortion and child-beating, understanding of the spiritual dimensions of Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous, dabbling in witchcraft or devil worship, and their place in the world.
David Beldon, 59, promised to go to Alcoholics Anonymous meetings but months later collapsed on a train platform after swigging brandy
1935: Alcoholics Anonymous was founded by William Wilson in Ohio.
The original use of the term disease in Alcoholics Anonymous was metaphorical, aimed at destigmatizing the condition and describing its relentless course if untreated.
After getting drunk on an opening night at Madison Square Garden, he lost his contract, after which he joined Alcoholics Anonymous, turned to Pilates as therapy, and ultimately decided to teach.
The halfway house incorporated programs similar to Alcoholics Anonymous. (Faith Works Milwaukee, Inc.)
At Thanet Magistrates Court yesterday he received a maximum community rehabilitation order of three years on the condition he receive psychotherapy, continue to pursue treatment for alcohol addiction and attend Alcoholics Anonymous meetings.
Alcoholics Anonymous has greatly informed the individual, social, and political landscape of the contemporary "self-help" (Riordan and Beggs, 1988; Kaskutas, 1994), or "mutual-aid" (Kropotkin, 1955; Makela, 1996) movement.