alcoholic

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alcoholic

 [al″kah-hol´ik]
1. containing or pertaining to alcohol.
2. a person suffering from alcoholism.

al·co·hol·ic

(al-kŏ-hol'ik),
1. Relating to, containing, or produced by alcohol.
2. One who suffers from alcoholism.
3. One who abuses or depends on alcohol ingestion.

alcoholic

/al·co·hol·ic/ (al″kah-hol´ik)
1. pertaining to or containing alcohol.
2. a person suffering from alcoholism.

alcoholic

(ăl′kə-hô′lĭk, -hŏl′ĭk)
adj.
1. Related to or resulting from alcohol.
2. Containing or preserved in alcohol.
3. Having alcoholism.
n.
A person who has alcoholism.

al·co·hol′i·cal·ly adv.

alcoholic

1 pertaining to alcohol or its effects on other substances.
2 a person who has developed a dependency on alcohol through abuse of the substance.

alcoholic

adjective
(1) Relating to alcohol.
(2) Referring to a condition induced by prolonged exposure to ethanol.
noun
(1) A person suffering from alcoholism.
(2) A person who has a subjective awareness of the compulsion to drink, exhibits prominent drink-seeking behaviour, becomes tolerant to alcohol, and has obvious physical, psychological and social problems related thereto. Addicted drinkers are susceptible to withdrawal symptoms following cessation or reduction in alcohol intake and thus use alcohol to avoid withdrawal symptoms.

alcoholic

adjective Referring to any condition induced by prolonged exposure to ethanol noun A person suffering from alcoholism, see there.

al·co·hol·ic

(al'kŏ-hol'ik)
1. Relating to, containing, or produced by alcohol.
2. One who suffers from alcoholism.
3. One who abuses or depends on alcohol.

alcoholic

1. Pertaining to alcohol.
2. Containing alcohol.
3. A person who habitually consumes alcoholic drinks to excess or who is addicted to alcohol to the detriment of health. A person suffering from ALCOHOLISM.

al·co·hol·ic

(al'kŏ-hol'ik)
1. Relating to, containing, or produced by alcohol.
2. One who abuses alcohol or depends on alcohol ingestion.

Patient discussion about alcoholic

Q. Alcoholism Steve 26 yr old suffered with bi-polar and the related drugs that eventually lead to his over dose. He died in where he felt a connection to the intellectual environment. After suffering with Steve for so many years, I am convinced that this disease is genetic; his grandmother also suffered with drug addiction and a mental disorder, but had that gene that must have been inherited by Steve. Any one in the area of mental health and genetic engineering Research? We want to set up or get involved with public awareness on the devastation of this disease which kills 100+ thousands in this country each year; yet society treats it as a social problem -- The advancement of mental research has been slow almost medieval -- Please help. No one, no family should have to suffer the way my beautiful son suffered and who had so much to give to humanity.

A. I,m going to tell you a story: I was born in Newark,New Jersey in 1956,my sister was born 1953.Me an my sister were both born with asthma.my mother liked to party alot with her friends,an my father drank at work sometimes an when he got home,every day at 5pm.One day when i was 6yrs old,my sister got sick(asthma attack). I remember my grand mother trying to get my mother to take my sister to the hospital,to call my father,finally when my sister almost stopped breath she was taken to the hospital-it was to late.If my parents had of been sober my sister would be here to day,This was my first exsperiance with ALCOHOL---growing up was not easy when i was young i used to go hide when my father came home(IT WAS VERY BAD) my father used to come home from work,get drunk an start to holla at my mother if denner was not the way he liked--he would holla,yell for no reason most of the time(THIS MAN WAS EVIL)--in those days people did not care about addiction like now-he is dead thank god?

Q. ALCOHOLISM what effect does it have on the digestive system?

A. Alcohol may increase the risk of developing cancers of the digestive system, including mouth, esophagus, as well as large bowel cancer, pancreas and liver.

Alcohol is well known to damage the pancreas and the liver, important parts of the digestive tract.

You may read more here:
www.mayoclinic.com/health/alcohol/SC00024

Q. alcoholism I am 17 years old and I love to drink alcohol. I go out partying and drinking every night with my friends. How can I tell if I am an alcoholic or just like to drink?

A. At age 17, it may seem like fun to go out and party and get drunk every night, but its symptomatic that you have let your self cross over the line that leads to self destruction. You have already admitted that you are worried about becoming an alcoholic and being referred to as a "drunk". If that bothers you, you had better get help or stop. If it doesn't bother you that people see you as "a drunk", then there's no point in anyone making any further replies to your post. Sooner or later, something bad will surely happen, that may make you wise up. But for many alcoholics which includes me, they have to hit absolute "rock bottom". Your life will surely go "south" if you keep it up, until you either wise up because of the hangovers, or you get to the bitter end of your rope. The end of the rope could be any of the following: jail, death, car wreck, lose job, lose spouse through divorce, get thrown out of the house, get sick from heart disease, beco

More discussions about alcoholic
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Drinking is often a symptom of underlying psychological and/or developmental problems; once alcoholics stop trying to "control" their drinking, they can begin to address these underlying issues.
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