Alcohol Flush Reaction

(redirected from Alcohol Flush)
A condition caused by the incomplete metabolism of alcohol with accumulation of acetaldehyde due to a missense polymorphism in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase—ALDH2—resulting in bright red skin due to capillary dilation of face, neck, shoulder, and sometimes the entire body after consuming alcohol. Those with ALDH2 deficiency have up to a 10-fold greater risk of oesophageal cancer, attributed to the accumulation of acetaldehyde
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Washington, Jan 20 (ANI): Chinese researchers hold rice responsible for the alcohol flush reaction, an unpleasant response to alcohol that is relatively common in people of Asian descent.
Writing in the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, the researchers believe that the mutation responsible for the alcohol flush reaction may have occurred following the domestication of rice.
Table 1 Some causes of facial erythema Atopic eczema Seborrhoeic eczema Sebopsoriasis Allergic contact dermatitis Irritant dermatitis Photocontact dermatitis Rosacea Lichen planus Lichen planus actinicus Carcinoid Glutamate sensitivity Table 1 Some causes of facial erythema Diabetic rubeosis Topical steroids Alcohol flush 'Weather beating' Mitral stenosis Poikiloderma Rothmund-Thomsen Sarcoid Lupus erythematosus Dermatomyositis Pemphigus foliaceus Erysipelas Hansenosis Lymphoma Haemangioendothelioma Keratosis rubra faciei of Brocq Ulerythema ophryogenes Erythrose peribuccale of Brocq Riehl's melanosis Perioral dermatitis Erythromelanosis faciei et colli
KEY WORDS: Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use (AODU), abuse and dependence; alcoholism; genetics and heredity; genetic theory of AODU; ethnic group; protective factors; ethanol metabolism; liver; alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH); aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH); risk factors; protective factors; alcohol flush reaction
People carrying an ALDH2*2 allele show an alcohol flush reaction, even when they consume only relatively small amounts of alcohol (Peng et al.
A single alcoholic drink significantly decreased blood pressure and increased heart rate in all 10 subjects, but the results were most dramatic in the four subjects who showed the alcohol flush when the subjects were taking prazosin.
This effect may occur only in people of Asian ancestry; the alcohol flush is rare in whites and blacks, Dr.
KEY WORDS: Alcohol use disorder; alcohol and other drug (AOD)-related (AODR) mortality; AOD use, abuse, and dependence; alcoholism; East Indians; Native American; Southwest California Indians; genetic factors; genetic polymorphisms; protective factors; alcohol flush reaction; ethanol metabolism; alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH); aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH); acetaldehyde; ALDH1; ALDH2; ALDH2*2; ALDH1A1*2; ADH1B; ADH1B*3
KEY WORDS: Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use, abuse, and dependence; drinking behavior; African American; ethanol metabolism; alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH); aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH); acetaldehyde; genetic factors; genetic polymorphisms; allele; ADH1B; ADH1B*3; ALDH1A1*2; ALDH1A1*3; protective factors; alcohol flush reaction
KEY WORDS: Ethanol metabolism; ethanol-to-acetaldehyde metabolism; acetaldehyde; aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs); alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH); alcohol metabolite; catalase; brain; central nervous system; protective factors; alcohol flush reaction; pharmacology and toxicology
KEY WORDS: ethnic differences; minority group; cultural patterns of drinking; female; African American; Asian American; Hispanic; Native American; spiritual and religious regulation of behavior; AOD (alcohol and other drug) abstinence; protective factors; risk factors; alcohol flush reaction; acculturation; cultural conflict; literature review