Akebia quinata

Akebia quinata

A potassium salt-rich climbing vine, the stem of which contains saponin and sapogenin and has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity. It is used in herbal medicine as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and diuretic, and for dry mouth, laryngitis, and sinusitis, and to promote secretion and ease childbirth.
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Shimmering Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Silver Sheen' breaks up the fence line, and fragrant Akebia quinata climbs up a railing to a second-floor deck.
Other evergreen climbing plant choices include Clematis armandii with its delightfully almond-scented white flowers in spring, or semi-evergreen, such as the chocolate vine, Akebia quinata. Star jasmine is beautiful but best for a more sheltered position.
Akebia quinata is commonly known as chocolate vine.
Antinociceptive and anti- inflammatory effects of the saponin and sapogenins obtained from the stem of Akebia quinata. J.
It has a green wall too, but the chocolate vines (aka Akebia quinata) that grow outside the building provide shade and cooling in the summer.
Use Akebia quinata to densely clothe a south- or west-facing trellis fence with attractive, divided leaves.
I have just planted the vigorous climber Akebia Quinata, the Chocolate Vine, semi evergreen with vanilla-scented flowers.
Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the saponin and sapogenins obtained from the stem of Akebia quinata. J.
There are three medicinal species, including Akebia quinata (Thunb.) Decne, Akebia trifoliate (Thunb.) Koidz, and Akebia trifoliate (Thunb.) Koidz.
Chocolate Vine - Akebia quinata - Carol struggles to get it to flower but loves the scented flowers and the strange sausage shaped seed pods, when they develop.
Further, mutong (Akebia quinata) is allowed in TCM herbal medicine practice to be substituted with either guan mutong (Aristolochia manshuriensis) or chuan mutong (Clematis armandii); and mu fangji (Cocculus trilobus) by guang fanchi (Aristolochia fangchi) or hanzhong fangji (Aristolochia heterophylla), thereby increasing the risk of exposing renotoxic AA-containing Aristolochia species to patients.
(1) Akebia quinata (the chocolate vine) This twining climber has pretty pale green foliage and vanilla-perfumed, purple-brown flowers appear in late spring.