ajna


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ajna

Paranormal
The sixth or brow chakra which, according to the ayurvedic construct of health, is the eye of intuition (the so-called third eye).
References in periodicals archive ?
The male and female energies of an individual meld at the Ajna chakra.
He is married and has 2 lovely children, a Daschund named Isis, and 3 Lovely cats (Ajna, Puff and Luminara).
We wanted to show through photography and art what is means to be silent for 25 years, what it means to come out with mothers who were raped and send a loud and clear message," said Ajna Jusic, president of the Association.
Ajna Kesely of Hungary won the gold in 4:07.14, Delfina Pinatiello of Argentina silver (4:10.40) and Marlene Kahler of Austria bronze (4:12.48).
Ajna Kesely of Hungary captured the 400m free gold medal in 4:07.14 with Argentina's Delfina Pignatiello (4:10.40) and Marlene Kahler of Austria (4:12.48) settling for the silver and bronze.
Ajna Kesely of Hungary captured the gold medal (1:57.8) and China's Junxuan Yang (1:58) settled for the silver.
Recently, Roney-Dougal (1989; 1991; 2001) has suggested that the pineal gland and its neurochemistry and neuro-anatomy may be of crucial importance in the occurrence of the so-called "psi phenomena" (Rogo, 1975; Rogo, 1976) and points to the association made by yogis between the pineal gland and the ajna chakra, the yogic psychic center that controls psi-experiences in those with awakened kundalini (Luke, 2012; Miller, 1978; Satyananda, 1972).
The 6th and 7th chakras, Ajna and Sahasrara chakras, correspond to third eye (intuition) and enlightenment, respectively.
Thiago Hersan, who moved from Brazil to Liverpool with his colleague Radames Ajna to be one of the first creative technologists to occupy FACTLab, said: "People often have an idea of what they think 'making art' means, but it's not until they actually see what we're doing that they really understand the value of the space and the practice.
A sima establishment involved an order (usually ajna) by the king whereby income from a certain property--one or more named villages, or rice-fields (savah), or uncultivated parcels (vatek) to be converted into rice-fields--was assigned to a specified beneficiary, usually a temple.