airway obstruction

(redirected from Airway obstructions)

airway obstruction

a mechanical impediment to the delivery of air to the lungs or to the absorption of oxygen in the lungs.
observations If the obstruction is minor, as in sinusitis or pharyngitis, the person is able to breathe, but not normally. If the obstruction is acute, the person may grasp the neck, gasp, become cyanotic, and lose consciousness.
interventions Acute airway obstruction requires rapid intervention to save the person's life. In cases of obstruction caused by a bolus of food, a collection of mucus, or a foreign body, the object may be removed manually, by suction, or with the Heimlich maneuver. Obstruction caused by an inflammatory or allergic reaction may be treated with bronchodilating drugs, corticosteroids, intubation, and administration of oxygen. An emergency tracheotomy may be required if the obstruction cannot be mechanically or pharmacologically relieved within a few minutes.
nursing considerations The patient is usually very apprehensive and may physically resist assistance. Medical help is summoned, and emergency care is begun and includes removing the obstruction, administering oxygen, and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, if necessary. See also aspiration.

air·way ob·struc·tion

(ār'wā ŏb-strŭk'shŭn)
A type of respiratory dysfunction that produces reduced airflow, usually on expiration; the obstruction can be localized (e.g., tumor, stricture, foreign body) or generalized (e.g., emphysema, asthma).

air·way ob·struc·tion

(ār'wā ŏb-strŭk'shŭn)
Respiratory dysfunction that reduces airflow, usually on expiration; can be localized or generalized.

airway

1. the passage by which air enters and leaves the lungs.
2. a mechanical device used for securing unobstructed respiration during general anesthesia or other occasions in which the patient is not ventilating or exchanging gases properly. Includes an endotracheal tube and a tracheostomy tube.

artificial airway
endotracheal or tracheostomy tubes.
airway obstruction
in the unanesthetized animal is usually caused by vomitus or laryngeal spasm due to foreign material in the larynx. In the nonintubated anesthetized animal, it is caused by caudal displacement of the tongue and epiglottis, accumulation of mucus, saliva and blood in the pharynx or laryngeal spasm resulting from that accumulation. In the intubated animal, faulty placement or functioning of the endotracheal tube or kinking of it can cause obstruction of the airway. The signs of obstruction are deep, asphyxial respirations, struggling and great agitation in the conscious animal. Deeply anesthetized animals simply show a decline in respiratory efficiency.
airway reflexes
aid in the removal of secretions and foreign material. See also cough, sneeze.
airway resistance
the resistance to airflow through the respiratory tree and any addition to the airway, such as the endotracheal tube and connectors in a closed circuit anesthetic machine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Endoscopic treatment of malignant airway obstructions in 2,008 patients.
Children with airway obstructions don't always present in acute respiratory distress; they could just have a nagging wheeze or cough with no obvious illness.
There are many causes of respiratory acidosis, for example: depression of the central nervous system by drugs, airway obstructions, laryngospasm and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), all of which will cause an increase in PaCO2.
Surgical management of airway obstructions during sleep.
Both snoring conditions arise from upper airway obstructions that prevent the lungs from filling properly.
However, more subtly, airway obstructions have been shown to play an important role in facial and dental deformities.
ArthroCare now offers ENT specialists the demonstrated benefits of our patented Coblation technology with both minimally invasive and traditional options to treat snoring, chronic nasal congestion, and other upper airway obstructions.
TM] Plasma Surgery System for performing many types of ENT procedures where removing and shrinking tissue is required, including turbinate surgery for nasal obstructions, Coblation-channeling procedures for airway obstructions, and tonsillectomies.
Coblation-channeling is performed by ablating a shallow channel in the soft tissue in the nose, mouth or back of the throat, where excess tissue creates airway obstructions that cause difficulty breathing.
Somnus' proprietary Somnoplasty System uses radiofrequency (RF) energy to provide a minimally invasive and less painful treatment of upper airway obstructions under local anesthesia.
Somnus' proprietary Somnoplasty System is designed to use radiofrequency (RF) energy to provide a minimally invasive and less painful treatment of upper airway obstructions under local anesthesia.
I am eager to help the company educate physicians about new treatment options and improve the quality of life for the millions of patients suffering from upper airway obstructions.