air pollution

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Related to Air toxic: hazardous air pollutants

air pol·lu·tion

contamination of air by smoke and harmful gases, mainly oxides of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen, as from automobile exhausts, industrial emissions, or burning rubbish.
See also: smog.

air pollution

Etymology: L, polluere, to defile
contamination of the air by noxious fumes, aromas, or toxic chemicals.

air pollution

The presence in the air of substances suh as carbon monoxide (CO), NO2, ozone, particulate matter, and SO2, which are byproducts of human activities, and which have an adverse effect on health. Fine (diameter ≤2.5 µm) particles are derived primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels in transportation, manufacturing, and power generation, and are mixed with soot, acid condensates, nitrate and sulfate particles, and may pose a greater risk to health as they are generally more toxic and can be inhaled deeply into the lungs; there is a significant association between fine particulate air pollution and deaths from cardiopulmonary disease, lung cancer, and other causes.
Health effects of air pollution Respiratory complaints, restricted activity, chest discomfort, sore throats, eye irritation; CO and ozone are linked to heart malformations and heart valve defects.

air pol·lu·tion

(ār pŏ-lū'shŭn)
Contamination of air by smoke, particulate matter, and harmful gases, mainly oxides of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen, as from automobile exhausts, industrial emissions, and burning rubbish.
See also: smog

air pollution

the presence of contaminants in the form of dust, fumes, gases or other chemicals in the atmosphere in quantities which adversely affect living organisms. See ACID RAIN.

air

the gaseous mixture that makes up the atmosphere. See also air sacs.

air capillaries
the minuscule vessels that connect the parabronchi in avian lungs, in which there are no blind-ended tubules.
air cell
the air-filled space between the internal and external shell membranes of a bird's egg.
air changes per hour
the standard measurements used to indicate the level of ventilation in a building especially with respect to removal of humidity, noxious gases and carbon dioxide.
air dried
said of feed that is dried in the open with only natural movement of air, e.g. conventional hay. Contains about 10% water.
air filtration
used as a means of reducing contamination inside a building, the efficiency depending on the pore size of the filter. A technique of some value when combined with temperature control in reducing the prevalence of pneumonia in calves in intensive veal producing units.
air flow rates
are important in assessing the suitability of a ventilating system in animal accommodation. Standards for suitable flow rates for different species and age groups for heating and cooling are available.
air gap technique
in radiography, a technique to reduce scatter of radiation by increasing the distance between the patient and the surface of the cassette.
air hunger
a distressing dyspnea affecting both inspiration and expiration which occurs in paroxysms; characteristic of diabetic acidosis and coma. Called also Kussmaul's respiration.
air movement
includes air changes voiding humidity and gases to the exterior plus movements within the space which facilitate cooling.
air passages
the combined air delivery system of the upper and lower respiratory tracts including nasal cavities, pharynx, laryngeal cavity, trachea, bronchi and bronchioles.
air pollution
contamination of the air with deleterious or esthetically unattractive chemical, physical or biological material. Usually reserved for pollutants generated by humans.
air pump
a small electrically driven appliance used to provide a constant stream of air bubbles to aquaria. The bubbles themselves add little oxygen to the water but the constant disturbance of the surface of the water does.
air quality
the determination of air flow rate, temperature, humidity, freedom from bacteria, solid particles, obnoxious effluvia and poisonous gases—especially hydrogen sulfide and methane from sullage pits under the animal accommodation.
air trapping
dilatation of alveoli without destruction of their walls.
air vesicles
extend radially from parabronchi in the lungs of birds and connect with air capillaries, in which gaseous exchange occurs with vascular capillaries.

Patient discussion about air pollution

Q. where would i find list of all the "clean" cities and the rates of air pollution ...?

A. i don't know about a list of "good" cities, but i know a list of the worse cities for Asthmatic people!-
http://www.webmd.com/asthma/news/20050215/americas-worst-asthma-cities

More discussions about air pollution
References in periodicals archive ?
Very little research on environmental contributions to the etiology of childhood brain cancer has been published, and to our knowledge no prior study has examined pre-and postnatal exposure to monitored concentrations of common ambient air toxics.
The air toxic emissions rules also provide a valuable set of rules for study because the rules were promulgated by two different presidential administrations--those of President Bill Clinton and President George W.
One is oxidation catalysts, a technology that EPA said can achieve up to 90% air toxics reductions from diesel engines, but can only reduce fine particle pollution by about 25 to 30%.
Air toxics and leukemia indicators have been developed at the county level for the purpose of tracking leukemia incidence rates, emissions of three air toxics associated with leukemia--benzene; 1,3 butadiene; and ethylene oxide--and the relationships between them (Hughes, Meek, Walker & Beauchamp, 2003; Kirman et al.
Major sources of the 189 air toxics to be regulated are those annually emitting 10 tons of one listed air toxics.
DISCUSSION: Experts from multiple disciplines discussed how best to move forward on air toxics benefits assessment, with a focus on developing near-term capability to conduct quantitative benefits assessment.
92% reduction in TRI urban air toxics since 1990, and 92% reduction in toxicity weighted hazard
The problem is that if you pick up a statute book and read section 111(d), it says the EPA cannot use the section to regulate any plants that are already regulated under the agency's air toxics program.
pattern is also observed, however, for air toxics despite the large
Nonhazardous waste from homes, business, and institutions ends up in municipal solid waste landfills, where it decomposes and breaks down to form landfill gas, which includes carbon dioxide, a number of air toxics, and methane.
Non-hazardous waste from homes, business and institutions ends up in municipal solid waste landfills, where it decomposes and breaks down to form landfill gas, which includes carbon dioxide, a number of air toxics and methane.
Additionally, from 1990 to 2008, emissions of air toxics declined by approximately 62 percent.

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