air pollution

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air pol·lu·tion

contamination of air by smoke and harmful gases, mainly oxides of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen, as from automobile exhausts, industrial emissions, or burning rubbish.
See also: smog.

air pollution

Etymology: L, polluere, to defile
contamination of the air by noxious fumes, aromas, or toxic chemicals.

air pollution

The presence in the air of substances suh as carbon monoxide (CO), NO2, ozone, particulate matter, and SO2, which are byproducts of human activities, and which have an adverse effect on health. Fine (diameter ≤2.5 µm) particles are derived primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels in transportation, manufacturing, and power generation, and are mixed with soot, acid condensates, nitrate and sulfate particles, and may pose a greater risk to health as they are generally more toxic and can be inhaled deeply into the lungs; there is a significant association between fine particulate air pollution and deaths from cardiopulmonary disease, lung cancer, and other causes.
Health effects of air pollution Respiratory complaints, restricted activity, chest discomfort, sore throats, eye irritation; CO and ozone are linked to heart malformations and heart valve defects.

air pol·lu·tion

(ār pŏ-lū'shŭn)
Contamination of air by smoke, particulate matter, and harmful gases, mainly oxides of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen, as from automobile exhausts, industrial emissions, and burning rubbish.
See also: smog

air pollution

the presence of contaminants in the form of dust, fumes, gases or other chemicals in the atmosphere in quantities which adversely affect living organisms. See ACID RAIN.

air

the gaseous mixture that makes up the atmosphere. See also air sacs.

air capillaries
the minuscule vessels that connect the parabronchi in avian lungs, in which there are no blind-ended tubules.
air cell
the air-filled space between the internal and external shell membranes of a bird's egg.
air changes per hour
the standard measurements used to indicate the level of ventilation in a building especially with respect to removal of humidity, noxious gases and carbon dioxide.
air dried
said of feed that is dried in the open with only natural movement of air, e.g. conventional hay. Contains about 10% water.
air filtration
used as a means of reducing contamination inside a building, the efficiency depending on the pore size of the filter. A technique of some value when combined with temperature control in reducing the prevalence of pneumonia in calves in intensive veal producing units.
air flow rates
are important in assessing the suitability of a ventilating system in animal accommodation. Standards for suitable flow rates for different species and age groups for heating and cooling are available.
air gap technique
in radiography, a technique to reduce scatter of radiation by increasing the distance between the patient and the surface of the cassette.
air hunger
a distressing dyspnea affecting both inspiration and expiration which occurs in paroxysms; characteristic of diabetic acidosis and coma. Called also Kussmaul's respiration.
air movement
includes air changes voiding humidity and gases to the exterior plus movements within the space which facilitate cooling.
air passages
the combined air delivery system of the upper and lower respiratory tracts including nasal cavities, pharynx, laryngeal cavity, trachea, bronchi and bronchioles.
air pollution
contamination of the air with deleterious or esthetically unattractive chemical, physical or biological material. Usually reserved for pollutants generated by humans.
air pump
a small electrically driven appliance used to provide a constant stream of air bubbles to aquaria. The bubbles themselves add little oxygen to the water but the constant disturbance of the surface of the water does.
air quality
the determination of air flow rate, temperature, humidity, freedom from bacteria, solid particles, obnoxious effluvia and poisonous gases—especially hydrogen sulfide and methane from sullage pits under the animal accommodation.
air trapping
dilatation of alveoli without destruction of their walls.
air vesicles
extend radially from parabronchi in the lungs of birds and connect with air capillaries, in which gaseous exchange occurs with vascular capillaries.

Patient discussion about air pollution

Q. where would i find list of all the "clean" cities and the rates of air pollution ...?

A. i don't know about a list of "good" cities, but i know a list of the worse cities for Asthmatic people!-
http://www.webmd.com/asthma/news/20050215/americas-worst-asthma-cities

More discussions about air pollution
References in periodicals archive ?
In a similar study at Dar-es-Salaam City, Tanzania, elevated level of NO2, CO and suspended particulate matter were reported at residential areas in the morning and evening time due to increased traffic flow and substantial domestic heating, where activities pattern and emission from mobile sources confirmed the elevated level of air pollutants at residential area(Jackson, 2009).
2 Given the high prevalence of diabetes and high levels of air pollutants in this region, it is necessary to conduct more studies in this regard.
Nevertheless, perinatal exposure to air pollutants may increase risk for ASD and should be a consideration in preconception care and for expecting mothers.
If the reaction between the air pollutant of interest and the collection medium is first order, irreversible and rapid, with a reaction rate constant of k (1/s), the third resistance becomes:
Before we can even know how to take action we need knowledge, and this is one way people can get knowledge about air pollutants.
Many state regulatory agencies specify the use of EPA's "Compilation of Air Pollutant Emission Factors," which is commonly referred to as AP-42.
Major sources are those facilities that emit 10 or more tons/year of a single toxic air pollutant or 25 tons or more of a combination of toxic air pollutants.
A new study now indicates that even federally permissible levels of carbon monoxide, a common air pollutant, can aggravate this life-threatening condition enough to send its victims to the hospital.
One challenge in assessing the health effects of human exposure to air pollution in epidemiologic studies is the lack of widespread historical air pollutant monitoring data to characterize past exposure levels.
2) Ventura County Air Pollution Control District technician Ron Lawson reads a bank of analyzers, each measuring a different air pollutant in Simi Valley.
What is the basis of genetic susceptibility, and has that changed as a result of gene--environment interaction over the past 20 years in a way that is associated with susceptibility to air pollutant exposures?
Also, GM originally used wet caps to lower air pollutant emissions from cupolas but is now using high-energy wet scrubbing.