aIle

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Related to Ailerons: yaw

aIle

Abbreviation for alloisoleucine.
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Boeing 757 operators have been ordered to inspect aileron components following an in-service report of an issue that limited a flight crew's ability to move the flight-control surfaces.
I have flown my Kitfox using this process many times and am impressed with the ease of maintaining control and blocking out the temptation to use the ailerons. I also used this while flying with Foggles and an instructor.
"Typically, there's more than 50 parts per component kit, and these include the kits for rudders, ailerons, leading edge stabilizers and trailing edge flaps."
From the days of the C-2, Aeronca ailerons have had a reputation for being heavy and not generating a particularly exciting rate of roll.
Kaman manufactured in-house monolithic and sandwich composite parts comprise the Aileron assemblies, which are brought together into the final assembly with bought-out components from the Kaman supply chain.
The Aileron assemblies are comprised of monolithic and sandwich composite parts manufactured in-house by Kaman, brought together into the final assembly with bought-out components from the Kaman supply chain.
He advised me that if it happened again, paddles would take me without the ailerons. We discussed the increase in approach speed and possible degraded handling.
The 16-year-old Airbus A 330-300 was flying between Dublin and Chicago O'Hare when the aileron, which keeps the plane stable, fractured at 33,000 feet on May 11.
Numerical simulations of the airflow around the NERVA control ailerons were performed and produced the values of the control lift force that appears at various tilt angles on the surface of the ailerons during the ascent flight into the atmosphere (Tache et al., 2009).
The roll motion of the aircraft is controlled by surfaces known as Ailerons. The two ailerons are present on either wing and are generally operated in differential mode.
The aircraft, which use spoilers for roll control rather than ailerons, were involved in a spate of accidents in 2004 and 2005, prompting calls by some to ground the fleet.
Since late 2001, the Air Force has spent about $1.4 million to purchase three ailerons (wing components that stabilize the aircraft during flight), $7.9 million for 24 cowlings (metal engine coverings), and about $5.9 million for 3 radomes (protective coverings for the radar antennae).