Aid to Families with Dependent Children

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Aid to Families with Dependent Children

A US federal assistance program administered by the Department of Health and Human Services from 1935 until 1996, when it was replaced by the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. The AFDC provided financial assistance to children whose families had low or no income.
References in periodicals archive ?
In an 1950 article entitled, "Illegitimacy and Aid to Dependent Children," the author argued, "Cultural attitudes are partially responsible for a higher illegitimacy rate among Negroes....
Illegitimacy and Aid to Dependent Children. Public Welfare, 8(10), 174-178.
Illegitimacy and its impact on the Aid to Dependent Children Program.
Facts, fallacies and future: A study of the Aid to Dependent Children program of Cook County, Illinois.
The New Deal's social insurance programs, especially Aid to Dependent Children, and post-war prosperity, had lessened the need for institutional care for dependent children that the orphanages had always provided.
The second period examines the Social Security Act and the development of two provisions for mother-only families: Aid to Dependent Children (1935) and Survivors' Benefits (1939).
In the decades following passage of Aid to Dependent Children, state and local governments increasingly passed rules that linked welfare with wage-earning.
Title IV included provisions for Aid to Dependent Children (ADC) and specifically authorized funds for the support of families "who have been deprived of parental support or care by reason of the death, continued absence from the home, or physical or mental incapacity of a parent."(19) As such, supporters maintained their ideal "to enable the mother to stay at home and devote herself to housekeeping and the care of her children."(20) In addition, ADC expanded the benefits of mothers' pensions in two important ways.
The creation of categorical aid to dependent children complicated policy for female-headed families.
Between 1935 and the early 1960s, state governments contested, challenged, and changed the meaning of "parental support" in Aid to Dependent Children. The original provision intended to aid children whose father had died, deserted, or suffered from a long-term disability.
The most helpful overview of Aid to Dependent Children may be found in Linda Gordon, Pitied But Not Entitled: Single Mothers and the History of Welfare (New York, 1994).
II (Chicago, 1938), 229, cited in Winifred Bell, Aid to Dependent Children (New York, 1965), 6.

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