Agrobacterium radiobacter

Agrobacterium radiobacter

(ag″rō-bak-tēr′ē-ŭm rā″dē-ō-bak′tĕr) [L. fr. Gr.]
The former name of the bacterium now called Rhizobium radiobacter. It is a gram negative rod shaped bacterium. It is an opportunistic pathogen that is a rare cause of bacteremia, endocarditis, and peritonitis mostly in mostly in immunocompromised patients, and is a rare cause of urinary tract infection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Calliari et al [32] reported that chicken patties made with 5% polymer from Agrobacterium radiobacter k84 showed no differences in moisture and protein contents compared to polymer-free patties.
A significant positive effect on grain yield and ARA in roots of barley was obtained due to combined inoculation of nitrogen fixer's Azospirillum lipoferum, Arthrobacter mysorens and the phosphate solubilizing strain Agrobacterium radiobacter by Belimov et al.
Rhizobium radiobacter was firstly isolated from human clinical specimens by Lautrop in 1967.5 Rhizobium radiobacter (Agrobacterium radiobacter) is a ubiquitous, aerobic, motile, oxidase positive, non-spore forming soil organism.6 It is usually known as a plant pathogen however can lead infections in human very rarely especially in immunocompromised patients.7 The type of contamination in patients with Rhizobium radiobacter infection remains hypothetical.
Chiodo, "Agrobacterium radiobacter pneumonia in a patient with HIV infection," European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, vol.
(1979) Agrobacterium radiobacter strain 84 and biological control of crown gall.
Proposal for rejection of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and revised descriptions for the genus Agrobacterium and for Agrobacterium radiobacter and Agrobacterium rhizogenes.
The nonpathogenic strain Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 and the recombinant strain K1026 have been investigated and commercialized for their efficiency as a biological control of A.
radiobacter (previously considered Agrobacterium radiobacter), an additional experiment was performed to determine the pathogenicity of the Rhizobium strains on sunflower plants (Helianthus annus) and found that these strains are not tumorogenic.
En respuesta a este problema global se han estudiado microorganismos degradadores de PETN como Enterobacter cloacae PB2 y Agrobacterium radiobacter, los cuales son capaces de degradar otros explosivos como el TNT y sus derivados (French et al.
En contraste, la quinta especie, Agrobacterium radiobacter, que es indistinguible fenotipicamente de A.
Survival of Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 on Various Carriers for Crown Gall Control.