agonistic behaviour

(redirected from Agonistic behavior)
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agonistic behaviour

a broad grouping of behaviour patterns that not only includes all aspects of AGGRESSION, including threat and actual attack, but also the consequent aspects of appeasement and flight.
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The effect of injury on the agonistic behavior of the stomatopod, Gonodactylus bredini (Manning).
However, based on what was observed in the present study, the agonistic behavior of the longarm river prawn M.
Male-male agonistic behavior, for example, is primarily related to territoriality, and dominance is established through antennal contact, stridulation, and fights (Alexander 1961, Khazraie and Campan 1997, Prado 2006, Wilson et al.
Many experiments have confirmed that American lobsters are aggressive in their inter- and intraspecific interactions (Tamm and Cobb, 1978; Rutishauser et al., 2004; Steneck, 2006; Williams et al., 2006; Williams et al., 2009); therefore, agonistic behavior is common among American lobsters congregating in and near lobster traps (Jury et al., 2001), as is the case with other decapods, including the rock lobster (Jasus edwardsii; Ihde et al., 2006), and the giant mud crab (Scylla serrata; Robertson, 1989), and the European green crab (Carcinus maenas; Bergshoeff et al., 2018).
There is actually a wide variety of canine behaviors that behavior experts would describe as "aggression"--or more accurately, "agonistic behavior" --but most dog owners are aware of only the most dramatic ones, such as growling, lunging, snapping, biting, and fighting.
To understand the patterns of competitive interactions in arid environments, we observed native and non-native bees in the Tehuacan desert in Mexico to determine whether individuals of the oligolectic bee Lithurgus littoralis Cockerell (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) displayed agonistic behavior to A.
Socialized piglets spent a shorter amount of time lying down during the first 24 hours following barrier removal compared to all other times and exhibited an increase in agonistic behavior. Sows had higher levels of cortisol and spent less time lying down during the first 48 hours after piglet socialization compared to all other times.
During a 3-year period, a captive American flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber) group showed recurring seasonal changes in the pattern of agonistic behavior. In spite of seasonal changes in the rates of agonistic behavior, dominance relations were generally stable across seasons.
A draw was declared if: the voles exhibited too little agonistic behavior to establish a dominant/subordinate relationship; both subjects exhibited ca.
Shortly after their arrival, the specimens showed extremely agonistic behavior towards each other and were isolated.