agonist

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agonist

 [ag´o-nist]
in pharmacology, a drug that has affinity for the cellular receptors of another drug or natural substance and that produces a physiological effect.

ag·o·nist

(ag'on-ist),
1. Denoting a muscle in a state of contraction, with reference to its opposing muscle, or antagonist.
2. A drug capable of combining with receptors to initiate drug actions; it possesses affinity and intrinsic activity.
[G. agōn, a contest]

agonist

(ăg′ə-nĭst)
n.
1. Physiology A contracting muscle that is resisted or counteracted by another muscle, the antagonist.
2. A substance that can combine with a receptor on a cell to initiate signal transduction.

Agonist

Anatomy Agonist muscle, prime mover. A muscle that causes a particular movement to occur, creating a normal range of movement in a joint by contracting; a muscle which moves in one general direction.
Molecular biology A ligand which binds a receptor at a site adjacent to the active site.
Pharmacology Agonist medication. A chemical entity that does not naturally occur in the body and acts on one or more receptors (e.g., mu, delta, and kappa opiate receptors) by structural mimicry of the receptors’ natural ligand(s). It may be an agonist or partial agonist for a particular receptor, promoting a receptor-mediated biological response, often by competing with another substance (usually the natural or native substance) at the same receptor. A partial agonist produces less than the maximum effect even if given in a concentration sufficient to bind with all available receptors.

agonist

Pharmacology A substance that promotes a receptor-mediated biologic response, often by competing with another substance at the same receptor. Cf Antagonist.

ag·o·nist

(ag'ŏn-ist)
1. A muscle (or group of muscles) whose contraction produces a specific action with reference to its antagonist muscle (or muscles).
2. A drug capable of combining with receptors to initiate drug actions; it possesses affinity and intrinsic activity.
[G. agōn, a contest]

agonist

1. A molecule, such as a HORMONE, NEUROTRANSMITTER or drug, that attaches (binds) to a cell receptor site to produce an effect on the cell. Many drugs are agonists having an effect similar or identical to natural body agonists. Other drugs act on the receptor in a blocking role and are antagonists. An antagonist is a molecule that interferes with or prevents the action of the agonist.
2. A contracting muscle that is opposed by contraction of another associated muscle, the antagonist.

agonist

  1. a substance capable of binding to a molecular target on the cell surface (RECEPTOR) to elicit a biological response. Examples include HORMONES and DRUGS.
  2. a muscle which initiates a response or change in position of a body part acting against an ANTAGONISTIC MUSCLE.

Agonist

A medication that has an affinity for and stimulates the activity of cell receptors that are normally stimulated by naturally occurring substances, including melatonin.

agonist 

1. An agonistic muscle.
2. A substance (e.g. a drug, hormone or neurotransmitter) that binds with a cell receptor to initiate a physiological response similar to that produced by the natural neurotransmitter or hormone. Example: pilocarpine, which mimics the effect of acetylcholine acting on cholinergic receptors. See antagonist.

ag·o·nist

(ag'ŏn-ist)
1. Denoting a muscle in a state of contraction, with reference to its opposing muscle, or antagonist.
2. A drug capable of combining with receptors to initiate drug actions; it possesses affinity and intrinsic activity.
[G. agōn, a contest]
References in periodicals archive ?
Samson Agonistes, like so many of Euripides's plays, is a political drama, in which the issues of sex and politics are inextricably connected, and whose leading female character, Dalila, is a complex woman who, like Euripides's women, is involved in an exceedingly complicated "double" game.
This essay is divided into three sections, each a window onto Blake's engagement with Samson Agonistes. I begin by tracking the dispersal of Milton's climactic scene at the pillars into powerful phrase-fragments that continue to sound through Blake's poetry of the 1790s.
Although Sweeney certainly participates in the bodily, lower class life that Morse describes as "fundamentally alien to consciousness," in Sweeney Agonistes he is also, as Nancy Hargrove acknowledges, "the sensitive, conscious character who realizes and tries to communicate to others the essential vacuity of a world and an existence without human or spiritual values as well as the sinful nature of man and his need for redemption" (167).
That my book, Agee: Selected Literary Documents, is referred to throughout this critical edition as published by "Whitson" (xvii), suggests at least inattention: the publisher's name is "Whitston." The same error occurs in reference to my 1991 book Agee and Actuality and also in a citation of Selected Literary Documents in Agee Agonistes (303).
The controversies over Samson Agonistes reflect the tensions with reading a text whose authority is debated on the basis of its biblical antecedent.
Brief and incisive on the early poems, detailed on the prose writings, Sherwood brings his argument to impressive fruition in his discussion of Milton's post-Restoration poetry, particularly the effect of his publishing Samson Agonistes and Paradise Regained together "to reflect on each other" (306-07).
Milton projects his perfect self in the Son in Paradise Regained; the controversial hero of Samson Agonistes is both chosen and profoundly flawed, capturing both sides of Milton's divided self-representations.
Drama "Hillary Agonistes" addresses religion and politics, creating a future in which 65 million people disappear and President Hillary Clinton must decide if it's the Rapture, the work of Satan or a Republican hoax.
Similarly, you can read Milton's Samson Agonistes, leave aside questions on Milton's use of the traditions of the Greek tragedy and ask about Samson as "an urban terrorist".
For Milton, Paradise Lost and his Restoration heroic play "Samson Agonistes" were religious, and not expressed through performance, but in association with the sublime ideas presented in the works.
Eliot's Sweeney Agonistes is one of the most important pieces in English poetry and drama, we commit the mistake of not answering an essential question about it.