gerontology

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aging

 [āj´ing]
the gradual changes in the structure of any organism that occur with the passage of time, that do not result from disease or other gross accidents, and that eventually lead to the increased probability of death as the individual grows older. See also aged and senescence, and see the Atlas on Aging.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The scientific study of the clinical, sociologic, biologic and psychological phenomena related to aging.
Synonym(s): geratology
[geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontology

/ger·on·tol·o·gy/ (jer″on-tol´ah-je) the scientific study of aging in all its aspects.

gerontology

(jĕr′ən-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The scientific study of the biological, psychological, and sociological phenomena associated with old age and aging.

ge·ron′to·log′i·cal (jə-rŏn′tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), ge·ron′to·log′ic (-lŏj′ĭk) adj.
ger′on·tol′o·gist n.

gerontology

[jer′əntol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, geras, old age, logos, science
the study of all aspects of the aging process, including the clinical, psychological, economic, and sociological issues encountered by older persons and their consequences for both the individual and society.

gerontology

Geriatics The systematic study of aging and age-related phenomena; senescence is attributed to
1. Accumulation of degradation products, coupled with a cell's ↑ inability to metabolize the products and/or.
2. Activation of longevity-determining or aging genes, that may be intimately linked to certain oncogenes–eg, c-fos, which evokes uncontrolled cell proliferation. See Garbage can hypothesis.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'ŏn-tol'ŏ-jē)
The scientific study of the process and problems of aging.
[geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontology

The study of the biology, psychology and sociology of ageing. Gerontology is concerned with the changes that occur in the cells, tissues and organs of the body with age, with the natural limits of cell reproduction, the causes of natural cell death, the effects of life style and physical activity on longevity and the psychological and sociological effects of ageing.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'ŏn-tol'ŏ-jē)
Scientific study of clinical, sociologic, biologic, and psychological phenomena related to aging.
[geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontology (jer″ontol´əje),

n the comprehensive (physical, psychologic, and social) study of aging.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aging research field is thinking expansively and putting the disparate pieces together.
American Federation for Aging Research & Merck Institute of Aging and Health.
Participants have given high ratings to the program and indicated that they have become more interested in conducting aging research.
Americans favor increased funding for medical research and have high expectations that research will, increase their longevity, a survey of 1,000 adults released by the Alliance for Aging Research shows.
In a national survey conducted for the Alliance for Aging Research, Belden and Russonello (1991) found that a large majority of Americans (66 percent) would like to live to be 100 years old.
The nomination, made by the Commonwealth Fund in New York and the Alliance for Aging Research in Washington, D.
The Association for Aging Research, which leased nearly 2,000 square feet on the tower's 18th floor.
In recognition of the quality of her research and leadership in the field, she has received several awards, including two MERIT awards from the US National Institute on Aging, and awards from the Allied Signal Corporation, Gerontological Society of America, and American Federation for Aging Research.
The aging research campus is well over 60 years old and will be modernized to meet current and future operations and research needs.
8220;The aging of our population means that more Americans will be faced with persistent pain,” says Cynthia Bens, Vice President of Public Policy for the Alliance for Aging Research.
During those 14 days, pushed by his own interest to challenge himself, Ellison starting asking questions that altered the course of Lederberg's experiments and would change the face of aging research in this country for years to come.
Scientists from Britain's Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit and the Institute for Aging Research of Hebrew SeniorLife compared the genetic codes of more than 75,000 people and identified a gene called IRS1 that is linked with having less body fat, but also with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease.