aggression

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aggression

 [ah-gresh´un]
a form of physical or verbal behavior leading to self-assertion; it is often angry and destructive and intended to be injurious, physically or emotionally, and aimed at domination of one person by another. It may arise from innate drives and/or be a response to frustration, and may be manifested by overt attacking and destructive behavior, by covert attitudes of hostility and obstructionism, or by a healthy self-expressive drive to mastery.

ag·gres·sion

(ă-gre'shŭn),
1. A domineering, forceful, or assaultive verbal or physical action intended to hurt another animal or person; the verbal or motor behavioral expression of the affects of anger, hostility, or rage.
2. Invasive behavior, as of a pathogenic organism or disease process.
[L. aggressio, fr. aggredior, to accost, attack]

aggression

(ə-grĕsh′ən)
n.
Hostile or destructive behavior or attitudes: physical aggression; verbal aggression; emotional aggression.

Aggression

Forceful physical, verbal, or symbolic action which is either appropriate and self-protective (e.g., self-assertiveness) or inappropriate (e.g., hostile or destructive behaviour). It may be directed outwardly at either the environment or another person, or inwardly towards one’s self, manifesting as depression, self-mutilation, or another negative response.

aggression

Psychiatry Forceful physical, verbal, or symbolic action which may be appropriate and self-protective–eg, healthy self-assertiveness, or inappropriate–eg, hostile or destructive behavior; aggression may be directed toward the environment, another person/personality, or toward the self–eg, depression

ag·gres·sion

(ă-gresh'ŭn)
A domineering, forceful, or assaultive verbal or physical action toward another person as an expression of anger, hostility, or rage.
[L. aggressio, fr. aggredior, to accost, attack]

aggression

Feelings or acts of hostility. Abnormal aggression is often associated with emotional deprivation in childhood, head injury, or brain disease, such as tumour, excessive alcohol intake or the use of drugs such as amphetamines (amfetamines).

aggression

a type of behaviour that includes both threats and actual attacks on other animals, though often limited to threat display. See also AGONISTIC BEHAVIOUR.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their parents or guardians then provided accounts of the teens' "aggressive behaviours" in the previous month.
"Certainly aggressive behaviours are problematic in their own right and also deserve our attention, but recognising the differences in the two behaviours means we can begin a discussion about whether we have to do something different with interventions related to general aggression," Ostrov said.
Following the theoretical premise given and the investigation in this area, the aims of the study are as follows: 1) analyse the differences between young offenders and non-offenders in the evaluated variables (emotional instability, anger, aggressive behaviour, anxiety and depression) and also the differences according to sex; and 2) compare the relation between emotional instability and anxiety, depression and aggressive behaviour mediated or modulated by anger in both groups.
Aggression during early childhood has often been considered as normative and the view has been taken that children will grow out of aggressive behaviours. Research has challenged this view, suggesting that relational aggression results in serious emotional and psychological consequences for the victim and the bully (Crick et al., 1997).
"Our study found that a good relationship with the teacher can protect genetically vulnerable children from being aggressive and, in consequence, from becoming the target of other children's aggressive behaviour." The findings can inform interventions aimed at addressing children's aggression, and can also be used in teacher-training efforts.
It also found two in three consider abusive comments such as name calling directed at someone with a disability as a hate crime, rising to three in four when aggressive behaviour such as pushing or hitting was involved.
For another hand, and classified as an outside--targeted behaviour as well as a conduct disorder, aggressive behaviour stands as the most critical social trait that commonly characterizes behaviourally disordered children.
Cowell said: "Do you want to get the eyeballing out of the way?" Seacrest asked: "What's wrong?" Cowell replied: "Your aggressive behaviour last night."
Social acceptance and the relationship between aggressive problem-solving strategies and aggressive behaviour in 14-year-old adolescents [Electronic version].
Three-year-olds exposed to more TV may be at increased risk for exhibiting aggressive behaviour, according to a report.
Coleman was hit in the pocket by the FA this week for showing "aggressive behaviour" to referee Mike Dean.

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