aggression

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aggression

 [ah-gresh´un]
a form of physical or verbal behavior leading to self-assertion; it is often angry and destructive and intended to be injurious, physically or emotionally, and aimed at domination of one person by another. It may arise from innate drives and/or be a response to frustration, and may be manifested by overt attacking and destructive behavior, by covert attitudes of hostility and obstructionism, or by a healthy self-expressive drive to mastery.

ag·gres·sion

(ă-gre'shŭn),
1. A domineering, forceful, or assaultive verbal or physical action intended to hurt another animal or person; the verbal or motor behavioral expression of the affects of anger, hostility, or rage.
2. Invasive behavior, as of a pathogenic organism or disease process.
[L. aggressio, fr. aggredior, to accost, attack]

aggression

(ə-grĕsh′ən)
n.
Hostile or destructive behavior or attitudes: physical aggression; verbal aggression; emotional aggression.

Aggression

Forceful physical, verbal, or symbolic action which is either appropriate and self-protective (e.g., self-assertiveness) or inappropriate (e.g., hostile or destructive behaviour). It may be directed outwardly at either the environment or another person, or inwardly towards one’s self, manifesting as depression, self-mutilation, or another negative response.

aggression

Psychiatry Forceful physical, verbal, or symbolic action which may be appropriate and self-protective–eg, healthy self-assertiveness, or inappropriate–eg, hostile or destructive behavior; aggression may be directed toward the environment, another person/personality, or toward the self–eg, depression

ag·gres·sion

(ă-gresh'ŭn)
A domineering, forceful, or assaultive verbal or physical action toward another person as an expression of anger, hostility, or rage.
[L. aggressio, fr. aggredior, to accost, attack]

aggression

Feelings or acts of hostility. Abnormal aggression is often associated with emotional deprivation in childhood, head injury, or brain disease, such as tumour, excessive alcohol intake or the use of drugs such as amphetamines (amfetamines).

aggression

a type of behaviour that includes both threats and actual attacks on other animals, though often limited to threat display. See also AGONISTIC BEHAVIOUR.